Various Towns, MS, TX, LA, AR Tornado, Mar 1933

SOUTHERN TORNADO DEATH TOLL MOUNTS TO 68 WITH 38 DEAD IN STATE, 6 IN WASHINGTON COUNTY.

MORE THAN SCORE OF FAMILIES IN COUNTY ARE LEFT HOMELESS.

17 DIE NEAR LAUREL.

SEARCH IS UNDER WAY IN BOGUE PHALIA FOR BODIES OF THREE COMMANDER CHILDREN WHO PERISHED WHEN HOME WAS BLOWN INTO STREAM.

Search For Bodies.
J. W. THOMPSON told the Democrat-Times over long distance telephone from Leland today that search for the bodies of the three Commander children, feared drowned in Bogue Phalia when the small house was blown into the stream, was confirmed this afternoon with the belief that at least one and possibly all of the bodies will be recovered.
At the request of the searchers MR. THOMPSON sent for log chains to be used in removing the portion of the house remaining in the Bogue, in which the bodies of the three youngsters are believed to be pinned. Searchers dragging Bogue Phalia this morning caught a button hole and ripped a portion of clothing from one of the bodies.
Chief of Police WILLIAMS TAGGART and SIDNEY MOYSE, members of the Red Cross disaster relief committee said G. C. WEATHERS will leave here this afternoon to make a survey of the rain swollen stream and determine what procedure will be taken to recover the bodies.
MR. THOMPSON said that the plantation owned by C. M. and C. HOPKINS of Biloxi, which adjoined his place was visited by the tornado, and a negro by the name of PAUL JOHNSON and an unidentified negro woman and been killed by the tornado and their bodies found in the ruins of their home. It brought the death toll in the county to six.
EARL PHILLIPS at Holly Knowe reported this afternoon that the Red Cross was administering relief to the homeless on the W. B. SWAIN plantation.

(By The Associated Press)
A mad spring storm which for two days battered the South from Texas to Alabama left sixty-eight known dead, hundreds of injured, wreckage and threat of floods in its wake today.
Mississippi suffered the heaviest loss of life with thirty-eight reported killed, Texas counted its dead at twenty, Louisiana, nine, and Arkansas, one. The list mounted steadily as reports trickled in from communities cut off by tangled communication lines and flooded highways and winds moved northeastward.
The storm broke in East Texas Thursday. Then it nicked the southwestern corner of Arkansas and drove full force up the Mississippi Valley with tornadic winds and a deluge of rain that blew in horizontal sheets.
In Mississippi, Sandersville, in the south, near Laurel, reported fourteen dead, eight children under school age. Seven were killed at Raleigh in Middle Mississippi, and the same number at Harmony, near Meridian. In Washington county up in the Delta six were dead as the storm moved steadily onward and began to diminish into strong winds and heavy rains over Alabama, Tennessee and Georgia.

Delta Streams Rise.
(By The Associated Press)
Charleston, Miss., April 1. -- Threateningly rapid rises occurred in already swollen streams in the Mississippi Delta today in the wake of yesterday's tornadoes.

DEATH TOLL IN JONES MOUNTS.
Laurel, Miss., April 1. -- Jones county's toll of dead from yesterday's storm reached seventeen today with the death of MRS. FOSTER HUDDLESTON, KERNEY CAMPBELL, and THEOTIS McGREW, negro.

27 FAMILIES LEFT HOMELESS.
MISS ALICE McLEES, executive secretary of the Washington County Red Cross chapter, after a survey of the tornado areas around Longwood and Chatham and on Bogue Phalia three miles east of Leland, stated to a Democrat-Times reported this morning that 27 families had been left homeless when their homes were demolished by the tornado.
Ten white families and ten colored families, were left without homes when their dwellings were blown away. Out on the J. W. THOMPSON and W. B. SWAIN plantations in the vicinity of Holly Knowe, three miles east of Leland, seven families are rendered without homes.
MISS McLEES and MRS. WAMPOLD carried with them to the Longwood- Chatham area bed clothing and planters in that vicinity will furnish food for the homeless.
The bodies of three children of WILLIAM COMMANDER, farmer on the J. W. THOMPSON plantation, believed drowned in the rain swollen Bogue Phalin when the COMMANDER cabin was blown into the middle of the stream, had not been rescued this morning.
MISS McLEES said that she was making plans to secure a big sive to begin searching for the bodies of the three children, a boy and two girls, who range in age from 2 to 9 years. Dragging of the Bogne with hooks was under way into yesterday and the search was resumed today.
The COMMANDERS were the only white family rendered homeless in the vicinity of Holly Knowe and the THOMPSON plantation. Six colored families were left without homes.
SAMUEL LEE WILLIAMS, 9 year old negro boy was drowned and his brother, OTIS, six, and sister, LILLY MAY WILLIAMS 12, are in the Colored King's Daughters Hospital, as a result of their home being blown into a drainage ditch on the W. B. SWAIN plantation.
Attaches at the Colored Hospital said LILLY MAY WILLIAMS sustained lacerated wounds about the limbs and shoulder and possible internal injuries. Her condition is regarded as serious. OTIS WILLIAMS' condition is considered painful.
Mayor D. G. HAM returned late yesterday after making a trip to the storm area around Holly Knowe and reported that bodies of two negro storm victims had been discovered in the ruins of a house.
MISS MARGARET IRVINE, in charge of the Leland branch of the Red Cross was dispatched to the Holly Knowe and Bogue Phalia scene.

The Daily Democrat-Times Greenville Mississippi 1933-04-01