Hopewell, AL Tornado, Apr 1903

Hamlet of Hopewell in Alabama Is Entirely Wiped Out by Storm.

TWELVE PERSONS DEAD AND MANY ARE INJURED

It Is Believed That Several of Those Injured Will Die - Storm Swooped on the Hamlet Without a Moment's Warning.

Birmingham, Ala., April 8. - Without a word of warning the little hamlet of Hopewell, 40 miles north of this city, and 1 mile from Hanceville, was swept away early this morning by a cyclone which cut a path of desolation a mile wide and 2 miles long across a prosperous farming section of Blount county. Twelve persons were instantly killed, three or four fatally injured and a score of others seriously hurt.

The Dead.
MR. and MRS. MASON GRIFFIN.
JAMES GRIFFIN.
HENRY McCOY.
FREDERICK McCOY.
MISS BIRDIE McCOY.
C. C. ODEN, prominent planter.
MISS NORMA ODEN.
HESTER ODEN.
MISS THELMA ODEN.
MRS. C. C. ODEN.
MISS GRIFFIN

Fatally Injured.
Son and niece of Nathan Griffin.
Mrs. Henry McCoy and two children.
R. G. Quick.
Dink Quick.
Family of John McCoy, seven persons.
Mrs. Hollestine Horton.
Miss Inez Horton.
Richard Griffin.

It is believed several of the injured will die.

The storm came from the southwest and traversed its destructive path in a northeasterly direction, tearing every thing in its way. The section through which it went is flat, on an elevated tableland in the hilly section of Blount county. There was not the slightest intimation of its approach until the houses were being torn to pieces.

Killed in a Twinkling.
One of the first houses visited was that of Nathan Griffin. The house was demolished and Mr. Griffin and his own son, James were killed in the twinkling of an eye. Mrs. Griffin was so badly injured that she died at an early hour this morning. The son and niece of Mr. Griffin made a miraculous escape, running from the house before the demolition was complete, and saving their lives. They were injured but will recover.

The remains of the Griffin famiy [sic] were carried this morning to the residence of H. A. Henderson, the nearest settlement.

The house of John McCoy was next wrecked, but he and his family escaped with severe bruises. The house was absolutely destroyed and the inmates cannot account for their escape. The timbers flew above and around them, but none of them were struck.

The home of Mr. Henry McCoy, son of Mr. John McCoy, received the worst impact of the storm. His wife was severely injured; two of his children are still unconscious and may die, and he and his babe and two other children were dead this morning.

Dead Father Clasped Baby.
He was still clasping his baby in his arms when his body was found close to the house. Evidently he had made an effort to get out of the house, carrying the children with him. The bodies are terribly disfigured, where flying planks struck them.

The storm then took an easterly direction and struck the house of Mr. C. C. Oden. The trees in the yard were twisted into gnarled shapes and even the vegetables in the garden were torn form their sockets in the earth. Mr. Oden was killed outright and so were his three daughters, 15, 12 and 9 years respectively. Mrs. Oden received injuries from which she died later on.

The home of Mrs. Henry Wharton was next attacked by the storm, and it was wrecked but Mrs. Wharton was not badly injured.

Then came the home of R. G. Quick. It went into smithereens and he and his two children were injured and a mule killed, but there were no fatalities here.

The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, GA 9 Apr 1903

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THREE DEATHS ADDED TO LIST

More Victims for Alabama Cyclone.

Two Children Die at Hanceville - Were Not Expected to Die.

Hanceville, Ala., April 9. - Two more deaths resulted today from the cyclone which swept the country west of here Wednesday morning about 2 o'clock.

They are ISABELLE McCOY, aged 6, and EFFIE McCOY, who was not considered one of the seriously injured. The former died early this morning and the latter about noon. The funerals were conducted from the Hopewell church and the family members were all buried in the same grave. Two other members of the same family are also expected to die.

The funeral services over the remains of the Odens was also conducted this morning. One of the Oden children, it is thought, will also die, being injured internally.

Reports of the damage of the storm across the river reached here today. The storm jumped to Summit, Ala., which is in the northern corner of Blount county, where several persons were severly injured and a dozen houses and barns destroyed.

The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, GA 10 Apr 1903

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PATH OF DESOLATION.

Twelve Killed and Score Injured by the Tornado In Alabama.

Birmingham, Ala., April 9. - Without a word of warning the little hamlet of Hopewell, 40 miles north of this city, was swept away by a cyclone, which cut a path of desolation a mile wide and two miles across a prosperous farming section of Blunt [sic] county. Twelve persons were instantly killed, three or four fatally and a score seriously injured. It is believed that several injured will die. The storm tore everything in its way. There was not the slightest intimation of its approach until the houses were being torn to pieces.

The home of Henry McCoy, son of John McCoy, received the worst impact of the storm. His wife was severely injured, two of his children are still unconscious and two other children are dead. He was still clasping his baby in his arms when his body was found close to the house.

Cambridge Jeffersonian, Cambridge, OH 16 Apr 1903