Waterbury, CT Train And Trolley Collide, Nov 1907

The Result Of The Collision Waterbury CONN Train trolley accident 11-29-1907.jpg

FIVE KILLED IN CRASH.

TROLLEY CAR HIT BY FREIGHT TRAIN AT CROSSING.

RAILWAY GATES NOT CLOSED.

FLAGMAN IS SAID TO HAVE SIGNALED A CLEAR TRACK AND CONDUCTOR FAILED TO PRECEDE CAR -- BOTH ARE ARRESTED -- BESIDES THE DEAD, FIVE PASSENGERS WERE SERIOUSLY INJURED AND CAR SMASHED.

Waterbury, Conn., Nov. 29. -- Five factory employes were killed about 6:30 this morning at the West Main street crossing over the Highland division tracks of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, when an extra Hartford-bound freight train crashed into a trolley car containing twenty-five persons bound for the pin factories in Oakville. The car was struck with great force in the middle, and the passengers killed were badly mangled. Five others were badly injured and had to be carried to their homes.
The dead:
SARAH RYAN.
ANNIE CORCORRY.
ROBERT FRENCH, Waterville.
WALTER HAYES.
JANE KELLY.
The seriously injured are:
KITTY HANLEY, leg broken and scalp cut.
MARGARET MELION.
JANNIE BENSON.
SADIE ALLEN.
ANDREW LEPLER.
Injuries Are Serious.
The injured, other that KITTY HANLEY, received scalp wounds, broken bones, and bad cuts, but it is not yet known whether the injuries of any will prove fatal.
Flagman JOHN FLAVIN and Conductor JOHN DILLION, of the trolley car, were arrested. The motorman of the car, CHARLES LEONARD, was not held.
It is customary to drop the gates at the railroad crossing on the approach of a train, but in this instance, it is said, the gates were up. The flagman, it is alleged, waved his flag, showing a clear track. It is also alleged that the conductor failed to go ahead of his car and see if a train was approaching.
Car Smashed To Splinters.
Although the engineer applied the brakes, the train crashed into the trolley car, smashing it to splinters and throwing the occupants in all directions. Many of those injured were carried to nearby stores, while some, who were unable to walk, were laid alongside of the tracks until carriages and ambulances took them to their homes.

The Washington Post District of Columbia 1907-11-30