Macon, GA Famous Aviator Eugene Ely Killed, Oct 1911

Eugene Ely photo.jpg Eugene Ely land on carrier.jpg Eugene Ely taking off from carrier.jpg

ELY'S FUNERAL TO BE AT DAVENPORT.

AVIATORS BODY WILL BE INTERRED AT IOWA HOME.

BODY WILL BE SENT TO TRI-CITIES FROM MACON, GA., WHERE HE MET DEATH YESTERDAY AFTERNOON.

Macon, Ga., Oct. 20. -- The body of Aviator EUGENE ELY, who was killed by a fall with his aeroplane at the state fair grounds here yesterday afternoon was sent to Davenport, Ia., today.

The cause of the accident has not been ascertained and it is hardly probable that it ever will. The machine was in perfect condition when ELY left the ground with it, as he had only a little while before rising to a height of 3,100 feet.

ELY was making one of his famous dips. He was seen to grab one of the levers and his assistants thought he was attempting to start up again. Instead of responding the machine crashed to the ground throwing ELY fifty feet from it. His neck was broken.

Macon, Ga., Oct. 20. -- EUGENE ELY, aviator, was fatally injured at the state fair grounds yesterday afternoon shortly after 4 o'clock, when his machine failed to rise after a sensational dip and plunged with him fifty feet to the ground. He fell in the middle of the enclosure of the racetrack, after almost clearing the machine by a desperate leap when he realized his peril. His body was broken in a score of places and he died a few minutes later, after regaining consciousness just long enough to mutter:
"I lost control -- I know I am going to die."

ELY made a flight yesterday morning, ascending to an altitude of 3,100 feet. At 2:45 o'clock he began his second flight of the day, rising gracefully from the track enclosure, which he circled in a few minutes, traveling about thirty miles an hour. As he was completing the circuit, he made a dip, seemingly to startle the thousands beneath him. The machine shot down with great velocity and the crowd applauded, thinking the aviator would rise, as he had done many times before. But ELY seemed to lose his grip on the lever, for the machine continued its downward plunge to the earth. He released the lever and half jumped. The machine was demolished and ELY struck with terrific force. He died shortly afterward. He was taken to the hospital.
ELY left his wife in New York two weeks ago to come to Macon to give a series of flights for the Georgia state fair in his Curtiss biplane. He had been giving spectacular flights here for eight days going up on one occasion in a rainstorm. Yesterday he even offered to make a flight by night, painting his craft with phosphorus, "so as to startle the natives," he told the fair directors.

The offer was refused, for the reason that he wanted a thousand dollars.

Before making his ascent yesterday afternoon, ELY told his attendants that he feared something would happen, and asked them to notify his wife immediately if it did, at their address in New York.

A telegram was sent to his father, N. D. Ely, of Davenport, Ia., notifying him of his son's death.

Muscatine Journal Iowa 1911-10-20