Elgin, IL Raceway Grandstands Collapse, Aug 1911

GRANDSTAND AT RACE GIVES WAY.

SCORE INJURED, FOUR SERIOUSLY, WHEN SPECTATORS' SEATS COLLAPSE.

LORIMER'S DAUGHTER GETS LEG BROKEN.

RACE STOPPED FOR TIME -- CHEERS GREET NEWS OF NO FATALITIES.

Elgin, Ill., Aug. 26.-- A score of persons were injured, four seriously, today when sections 84 and 110 of the road race grandstand collapsed. The accident occurred only a few moments after the last car in the Elgin Cup race driven by Ralph Mulford had gotten way.
Among the injured were MRS. RAY GRAHAM, daughter of Senator William Lorimer, and daughter-in-law of Andrew Graham, recently a candidate for mayor of Chicago, and MRS. CHARLES COEY of Chicago, whose eye was badly bruised and her ankle twisted. MRS. GRAHAM'S leg was broken. This injury, with two others of a similar nature, were the only serious ones.
The race was stopped at the end of the first lap and those who were unable to walk were removed to the field hospital in ambulances.
Mulford had reached the back stretch when the accident occurred. The seats which fell were of the kind known as
"circus" and were hastily completed yesterday by a Cleveland, O., contractor who had furnished them to the recent aviation meet. The stringers on which the seats rested had been nailed to the pilings instead of being anchored and the strain of the crowd proved too heavy a burden. The nails gave way and the boards sliding forward with their load of human freight then sagged from the rear.
The whole mass sank and the occupants of the seats were thrown into a huddle in the middle. It was remarkable that practically every injury was done to the ankles.
As the stand collapsed a sudden hush fell over the field and here and there the onlookers gasped out that friends or relatives were in the accident.
When word was megaphoned "nobody killed" there were cheers and a round of handclapping. The races were resumed at 11:50 o'clock after a delay of 50 minutes.
Among those injured by the collapse of the grandstand are MRS. H. V. CARVER, of Marion, Ia., contusions; R. C. TOMS, of Marion, Ia., contusions.
Mulford set a pace of 69 miles an hour and in the third lap moved to the lead. He did one lap, the second, in 7 minutes and 14 seconds, or at the rate of 70 miles an hour. He went out, however, on the 76th mile.

Waterloo Evening Courier Iowa 1911-08-26