Pulaski, IL Train Wreck, Jan 1903

Horror on Horror Accumulates - Burning Oil Flashed Through the Cars Like Exploding Powder.

CAIRO, Ills., Jan 28.-On the Illinois Central railroad near Pulaski early today the Chicago fast train crashed into the rear end of St. Louis train No. 203. Both of the trains were late on account of a dense fog, and the Chicago train was running at the rate of 60 miles an hour, while the St. Louis train was making only 30 miles an hour.

The last car of the St. Louis train was the private car of the late JUDGE J. FENTRESS and family, of Chicago. JUDGE FENTRESS, who died in Chicago last Monday, was the head counsel of the Illinois Central, and his body was in the car en route to Bolivar, Tenn., for burial. The real half of the car was demolished and the coffin broken up. The family of the judge were badly shaken up. Three of the trainmen were injured but none of the passengers were seriously hurt.

Olympia Daily Recorder, Olympia, WA 28 Jan 1903

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Coffin Containing JUDGE FENTRESS' Body is Broken Open.

Cairo, Ill., Jan 28.-A rear-end collision occurred on the Illinois Central about 4 o'clock this morning, twenty-five miles north of Cairo, near Pulaski. The Chicago fast train No. 3, crashed into the rear end of the St. Louis train No.203, which is due here at 4:17 a. m.

Both trains were late on account of the dense fog, and the Chicago train was running at the rate of sixty miles an hour, while the St. Louis train was making only thirty miles an hour. The last car on the St. Louis train was the private car of the late JUDGE FENTRESS and family of Chicago. JUDGE FENTRESS, who died in Chicago Monday, was the head counsel for the Illinois Central, and his body was being brought to Bolivar, Tenn., for burial.

The rear of the car was demolished, and the coffin containing the body of the Judge, was broken open. The family of the Judge, who were in the front end of the car, were badly shaken up.

Fireman HARRY BRACKNER of the Chicago train, who lives at Centralia, was seriously injured. MEL B. WILLARD of Centralia, engineer of the Chicago train, was slightly injured. CHARLES BRYANT of Cairo, the flagman of the St. Louis train, who was in the Fentress car, was badly injured. The two trains carried a large number of passengers, none of whom were injured.

Dallas Morning News, Dallas, TX 29 Jan 1903