Cass, IN Train Crash In Washout, June 1901

THIRTEEN ARE DEAD -- UNLUCKY NUMBER.

The First Stories of the Ditching of the Wabash Flyer Exaggerated But Little -- Injured Number Forty-Four.

The Dead:
MRS. MATTIE CRUSE, wife of JOE CRUSE, of New York, who was injured.
MISS FANNIE MUHLOIC, sister to JOHN MUHLOIC, who was slightly injured.
LUIGI BENINI, New York.
FIVE ITALIAN MEN, names unknown.
TWO ITALIAN WOMEN, names unknown.
THREE ITALIAN BABIES.
The Injured:
JOHN F. WILLIAMSON, newsboy, Bowling Green O., both arms and both legs broken; will die.
H. A. SEABRIGHT, Logansport, Ind.
E. P. CLAUGH, baggagemaster, Toledo, O.
JULIA DePAPE, St. Louis.
MRS. THOMAS JONES, Cedar Springs, Ont., slightly bruised.
EARL JONES, her son, slightly bruised.
JAMES RAY.
MRS. JAMES RAY, en route to Dallas.
R. S. BRADSHAW, Fort Wayne, Ind.
A. D. THOMPSON, Peoria, Ill.
WALTER LAIDLOW, Wabash, Ind.
CHARLES FLANIGAN, brakeman, Toledo.
CHARLES C. VOORHEES, New York.
JOHN WILKINS, Lafayette, Ind.
NICOLA POLASKI.
JOHN C. ICKES, Fresno, Cala.
JOHN F. ICKES, his son.
ANNIE GRUBER, nine years old, St. Louis.
LENA GRUBER, two years old.
G. A. THOMPSON, porter.
JOHN MUCHLIVIC, New York.
WILLIAM BRADE, Angola, Ind.
JOSEPH GROSSE.
MRS. JOSEPH GROSSE.
MARTIN BLYE, Logansport, Ind.
CLARK TAYLOR, Logansport, Ind.
OTTO LUKENVILLE, Hoboken, N. J.
CHARLES PARKE, coal miner.
MRS. CHARLES PARKE.
Three year old son of PARKE'S.
IRENE PARKE, two months old.
DAVID AGNEW, Greenup, Scotland.
JOHN O'MARRO, Italian.
JOSEPH POZZA.
JOSEPH CRUSE, Cotergate, Utah.
GEO. S. MILNER, Alton, Ill.
F. E. BROWNELL, baggagemaster, Toledo.
Unknown Itallian and his wife; man will probably die.
J. B. WOOD, engineer, Logansport.
C. P. HORN, Logansport.
JOHN DORMISH, Pittson, Pa.
J. E. CALKINS, Toledo.
Engineer BUTLER and Fireman JOHN ADAMS, both of Peru.
REV. FATHER WALSH, Logansport, Ind.

(Special to the Journal-Gazette)
Logansport, Ind., June 26 -- Sunrise this morning disclosed a frightful scene in and around the ditch into which the Wabash passenger train plunged last night. Throughout the night farmers with lanterns and crude wrecking tools had worked to extricate the dead and wounded from the huge pile of shattered cars, and the steep banks were lined with crushed bodies, some silent, others moaning in death agony. In the ditch lay the engine, its nose buried in the earth and covered with the splintered remnants of the baggage and express cars, day coaches, chair cars and sleepers. A big gap in the track, twisted rails and the crushed culvert showed where the train had made its leap into the darkness.
Relief Trains Busy.
Since daylight relief trains have been clearing away the debris, and car loads of the wounded have been sent here, to Peru and to Lafayette. One train which left the scene of the accident at 4 o'clock carried twenty-seven persons, half of whom were women. Three of them died on the way to the Wabash general hospital at Peru.

Continued on page 2