Jeffersonville, IN Tornado, Mar 1890

And Louisville is not left alone to mourn this dreadful visitation. The city of Jeffersonville was also invaded and many of her homes destroyed, but, it is thankfully reported, with no case of death in a single household.

At Jeffersonville, Ind.

JEFFERSONVILLE, Ind., March 29 – The great tornado that destroyed part of the city of Louisville crossed the river and demolished 500 houses in this city along Front street, one-half of which are brick. The state of affairs here is proportionally great as in Louisville, and the loss to property now is estimated at $500,000. New Albany, five miles below, escaped the cyclone. It took a southwestward course and was probably three minutes passing, sweeping everything in its swath. With the Ohio flood slowly but surely creeping in, together with the terrible calamity of last night, Jeffersonville is placed in an awful predicament.

Newark Daily Advocate, Newark, OH 29 Mar 1890

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The tornado crossed the river and badly wrecked Jeffersonville, Ind., at eight o’clock. Several fires were burning at the same time, bet [sic] were extinguished soon. A large building was blown down and one hundred men buried in it. Every other house on market and Jefferson streets to Sixteenth street is gone. At the union depot a Chesapeake & Ohio train was just leaving for Washington. The building fell on the train.

Newark Daily Advocate, Newark, OH 29 Mar 1890

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The work of the tornado in Jeffersonville was confined to three blocks near the river. From this spot the tornado leaped into the air, and skimmed across the city and out into the open country beyond, where it went roaring into the night, scaring the farmers and upsetting a barn or two, but doing no really serious damage. Conservative estimates of the damage in Jeffersonville are placed at $150,000.

Newark Daily Advocate, Newark, OH 31 Mar 1890

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OVER IN JEFFERSONVILLE

Out of about eight houses destroyed by the tornado in Jeffersonville, owners of four fifths of the number are poor people whose little homes were their only possessions. All of the homeless ones have been given shelter by their more fortunate neighbors, but the situation over there has been much underestimated, and it is a mistake to suppose that no assistance is needed in the little city across the river. In the blocks between Market, Front and Mulberry and [illegible] nearly every home is ruined and the [illegible] lost their furniture. Since the accident Dan Phipps as fed and given shelter to thirteen families. J. Ferguson, a grocer has provided for an equal number.

The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, GA 2 Apr 1890