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Waterloo, IN Collision Kills One And Injures Several, Mar 1917

Waterloo wreck

FAST TRAIN IN A WRECK.

FIREMAN IS KILLED AND ENGINEER IS FATALLY INJURED.

BAD PILE UP OCCURS EAST OF WATERLOO.

PASSENGERS GIVEN SCARE, BUT ESCAPE WITH FEW CUTS AND BRUISES.

The Dead:
CHARLES MOAT, 50, Toledo, fireman.
The Injured:
JAMES MOULTON, engineer, Toledo, injuries regarded as fatal.
H. M. MOFFITT, San Francisco.
H. A. VALENTINE, San Francisco.
F. A. FISHER, Antwerp, South Dakota.
DR. F. F. RAKE, Norway, Maine.
The last four named were passengers. Their injuries consist of cuts and bruises and are not regarded as serious.
(Special to The Sentinel.)
Butler, Ind., March 21. -- CHARLES MOAT, 50, fireman, was killed outright. Engineer JAMES MOULTON, was seriously injured and a score of passengers were painfully bruised when west-bound passenger train No. 19, on the New York Central railroad, crashed into a number of cars that had been piled on the main track as the result of a wreck of an east-bound freight train, at 12:05 o'clock this afternoon one mile and a half east of Waterloo.
The passenger train was an hour late and was running at a terrific speed when the accident occurred. The passenger cars were derailed, but none of them turned over, due largely to the fact that they were of steel construction.
Freight In Wreck.
Just a few minutes before an east-bound freight train was wrecked on the siding, several of the freight cars falling over onto the main track. Cause of the wreck of the freight train has not been explained. Before the crew of the freight had an opportunity of warning the passenger train, the second wreck had occurred.
Fireman MOAT was killed instantly. He was buried beneath the debris and it was some little time later that his mangled body was removed. Engineer MOULTON attempted to jump. He is believed to be fatally hurt and was unconscious when found near the scene of the crash some minutes later.
Thrown Fifty Feet.
One of the big heavy steel, passenger cars was thrown for a distance of fifty feet and yet did not turn over. Had any of the passenger cars turned over the chances are that none of the passengers would have escaped death or serious injury.
This same passenger train struck a truck at the station here yesterday, demolishing the truck and throwing baggage in every direction.
MOAT, the dead fireman, was married and lived in Toledo. He had been in the employ of the New York Central for a number of years.

The Fort Wayne Sentinel Indiana 1917-03-21

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WRECK CLAIMS ANOTHER VICTIM.

ENGINEER MOULTON, IN SMASH-UP AT WATERLOO, DIES IN KENDALLVILLE HOSPITAL.

Waterloo, Ind., March 22. -- Engineer CHARLES MOULTON, who was injured in the wreck on the New York Central lilnes Wednesday noon, died in the Kendallville hospital late in the afternoon. MR. MOULTON'S home was in Elkhart. W. E. STONER, fireman, was killed instantly. His body was cut in two across the breast. The following were those less seriously injured:
H. M. MOFFIT, San Francisco, cut on hand.
H. A. BALENTINE, San Francisco, cut on leg.
DR. F. E. DRAKE, Norway, Maine, enroute to Arizona, lip cut and teeth knocked out.
J. N. DELL, Chicago, stewart on dining car, head bruised.
R. A. SMITH, Chicago, cook on diner, thrown headlong in car, foot burned by scalding grease.
PETER BECK, fourth cook, Chicago, leg bruised.
The most serious wreck that has ever occurred at or near Waterloo occurred at noon Wednesday when train No. 19, a limited fast train, crashed into a freight train one and a half miles east of Waterloo.
An eastbound train, New York No. 4, in charge of Conductor G. C. REEVES, met with an accident just at the point of the wreck of the passenger train. An air hose broke and about fourteen cars were piled up in a heap. The fireman of the freight tried to signal back to the engineer of the limited train, and the signal was observed by the engineer of the fast train, but all brakes were then set and there was no chance to stop the train as its momentum carried it on with a force and the big steel monster ploughed through the stock car, which was loaded with hogs and had been thrown across the westbound track. From this point the engine seemed to swerve and it pluged forward with a jerk and toppled over in the ditch to the north of the tracks.
The force of the heavy train, made up of ten Pullmans, gave the forward part of the train such a velocity that it kept going and swerved to the right of the track and engine in the ditch. The head Pullman went through the fence north of the right of way and, leaving the trucks, ploughed through the soft ground for a distance of one hundred feet.

The Fort Wayne Sentinel Indiana 1917-03-22

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