Jennings, KS Train Wreck, Sept 1930

ORDERS CONFUSED IN FATAL WRECK

DENVER, Sept. 29 -- Confusion over train orders is said to have caused a head-on collision between two fast freight trains on the Rock Island railroad near Jennings, Kans., last night, which resulted in the deaths of the engineers on each train and injury to a brakeman.  The dead are Frank V. Hill and Roy Lasley, both of Goodland, Kans.  The injured brakeman is Charles S. Tuttle, also of Goodland.  Train service over the Rock Island tracks will be delayed practically all of today, while the wreckage is cleared away.  Investigations are underway.

San Diego Union, San Diego, CA 30 Sept 1930

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ORDERS MIXED; HEAD-ON KILLS TWO ENGINEERS

Two Other Rock Island Trainmen Are Injured in Kansas Wreck

'MEET' ORDERS WERE CONFUSED

Engineers Collide Between Towns After Wrong Orders

(By Associated Press)

NORTON, Kans.; Sept. 29 -- Frank Hill and Roy Lasley, locomotive engineers, are dead and Chas. Tuttle, brakeman, is in a hospital here, injured as a result of a head-on collision of two Rock Island freight trains three miles east of Jennings, Kan., last night.  The wreck was was [sic] caused by a confusion of orders.

The enginemen were crushed and scalded to death.  One engine rolled down an embankment carrying with it several cars which piled up. The "meet" order confusion is said to have been scheduled for one passing place but the engineers got orders for different passing places.  The collision occurred between the points.

The Daily Free Press, Carbondale, IL 29 Sept 1930

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No More Bodies Found in Wreck

NORTON, Kan., Sept 29. -- Wrecking crews clearing away wreckage of two Rock Island freight trains which collided headon last night three miles east of Jennings, Kan., killing two members of the train crews and injuring another, late today had failed to discover any additional bodies of wreck victims.

Belief had been expressed by railroad officials that four trams may have been killed in the crash.  Ten tramps were reported riding one train and officials said only six were accounted for.

Nevada State Journal, Reno, NV 30 Sept 1930