New Orleans, LA Famous Aviator Killed, Dec 1910

John Moissant aviator.jpg John MOISANT Aluminum Airplane.jpg

MOISANT PREPARING FOR CUP FLIGHT FALLS; KILLED.

AVIATOR WHO FLEW WITH PASSENGER FROM PARIS TO LONDON LOSES LIFE.

FALLS HUNDRED FEET.

FALLS FROM MONOPLANE WHILE SEEKING A LANDING WHEN PLANE SUDDENLY TILTS, THROWING HIM FROM HIS SEAT.

New Orelans, La., Dec. 31. -- JOHN B. MOISANT, the avaitor, was probably fatally injured this morning while trying to make a landing at Harahan, three miles above New Orleans, when his machine turned head down at an altitude of 100 feet, throwing MOISANT out head first. The machine was wrecked.
MOISANT died on a special train on route to this city from Harahan.
MOISANT, in his fifty house power Bleriot monoplane with a special thirty-five gallon gasoline tank aboard, left the aviatioin field in this city at 10:05 and flew to Harahan, where a special ground had been laid out over which the aviator was to try for the Michelin Cup. MOISANT circled the field twice trying to find a landing place. This was difficult, the field being on the edge of the Mississippi River and the swamps on all other sides. Suddenly from some cause which may never be known, the monoplane turned head downward and horrified watchers saw MOISANT pitch clear over the head of the machine, and fell like a plummet fully a hundred feet, landing on his head.
MOISANT was thrown from his monoplane and landed on his head, 36 feet from where his machine struck the ground. His neck was broken by the fall and death resulted almost instantly. Otherwise there was no bruise on his body. The moment MOISANT struck the earth, falling in the woods, some workmen who happened to be near, picked him up while newspaper men and officials rushed to him. A special train of flat cars was standing near the scene of the accident and the body was placed aboard, brought to the city and taken to an undertaking establishment.
The expression on MOISANT'S face was that of a sleeping man, not the slightest trace of fear or pain being apparent. The wind was the cause of the accident. MOISANT, guided by the white flags which lined the course, rounded the circle twice in an effort to find a landing place.
The third time around the wind, which was blowing about fifteen miles across the course, drove the machine to the earth. MOISANT in trying to get back over the grounds, swerved suddenly to the left, then attempted his famous right circle, considered so dangerous that it is said but one other man beside the dead aviator ever attempted. At this instant the wind caught the planes of the machine. It tipped, pointed its nose directly at the ground and came down like a flash, while MOISANT, hurled from the machine
dove headfirst to the earth.

Muscatine Journal Iowa 1910-12-31