Little Sable Point, MI (Lake Michigan) Schooner KATE BULLY Lost, Oct 1869

SERIOUS MARINE DISASTER.

THE SCHOONER "KATE BULLY" OF CANADA, WATER-LOGGED AND CAPSIZED -- THE CAPTAIN WITH THREE SEAMEN AND COOK LOST -- NAMES OF THE OFFICERS AND CREW LOST AND THREE SAVED.

From Mr. Henry Niedecken, of this city, who has just returned from the Eastern shore, we have the details of the loss of the Canadian schooner Kate Bully with part of her crew.
The vessel was two years old and is known on the lakes. She has been to this port several times and loaded grain here for Canadian ports. She was bound from the river St. Clair for Chicago, and was laden with ties and splices for Chicago. In the great gale of October 4th, the vessel was water-logged in Lake Michigan, and at 9 p.m. of the same day, when off Point Sauble, she capsized.
At the time the sea was breaking over the unfortunate vessel and it was with the utmost difficulty that the crew could cling to the wreck. All night long they floated in the sea, vainly hoping for relief, and one by one a part of the unfortunate crew dropped off and were swallowed up by the waves.
During the night of October 4th, the first mate G. KENNEDY and ED. CORBETT and MERRITT BOLEY were lost, and on the following morning Capt. H. M. GLASPIN, seaman THOMAS DUREM and MARY WILSON, cook, were lost, making in all six persons lost.
All day long and the next night, up to 4 o'clock of the afternoon of the 6th, the crew clung to the wreck. At least half a dozen vessels passed them but did not see the wreck. Some of the vessels passed so closely that the unfortunate men could see those on their decks, but no offer of help was made.
At 4 p.m. of the 6th the schooner Black Hawk hove in sight, and her noble-hearted commander, although some distance off when he saw the vessel, bore down to it, and while the sea was running high, succeeded, after more than one gallant effort, in rescuing the second mage, SEBOR TURCOTT and JOHN STONE and CHARLES O'CONNOR, seamen, with ELIZABETH MITCHELL, passenger.
When taken off, the survivors were so nearly exhausted that they could not help themselves in the least. The passenger, ELIZABETH MITCHELL, had sustained herself and encouraged the men by words and deeds during the trying time, but all had to be lifted like helpless children into the boats and upon the deck of the Black Hawk. Had they been left upon the wreck another night, as all expected to be, every soul would have perished.
The second mate of the Kate Bully arrived at Manistee on the 8th, and from him Mr. Niedecken had the information given above. The tug Williams at once went in search for the vessel. The second mate informed Mr. N. that he had passed through many trying scenes during his life on the lakes, but never anything like this. He said he hoped never to witness anything like it again. The crew as they clung to the wreck tried to sustain each other, but every time one was washed off and sunk at once beneath the waves, it sent a thrill of horror through the hearts of all. The survivors were shown every attention and comfort on board the Black Hawk, and owe their lives to the courage and humanity of the officers and crew of that vessel.

Weekly Wisconsin Milwaukee 1869-10-13

Comments

blackhawk

my greatgrandfather was the captain of the BlackHawk Erhard Williams, or perhaps his father-we have many paintings of the Blackhawk, Betsy Fowler