Point Aux Barques, MI (Lake Huron) Tug FRED A. LEE Lost, Nov 1936

Tug FRED LEE.jpg

SOO TUG, FIVE MEN GO DOWN IN LAKE HURON.

SHIP FOUNDERS OFF POINT AUX BARQUES.

FRED A. LEE MEETS WITH DISASTER WHILE RETURNING HERE FROM WALLACEBURG.

Rogers City, Mich., Nov. 14. (AP) -- Coast Guardsmen searched today for trace of a vessel, believed to have been the 70-foot tug Fred A. Lee of Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., which sank mysteriously in Lake Huron late yesterday, apparently with all hands.
Although no wreckage was found at the scene bearing a name, Coast Guardsmen said all indications pointed to the Lee, which left Sarnia, Ont., Thursday afternoon with five men aboard as the identity of the vessel.
The Wallaceburg (Ont.) Sand and Gravel Co., which had the Lee under charter during the summer and fall, said five men engaged to return the tug to winter quarters at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., were aboard when the vessel left Sarnia.
They were:
Captain ACHILLE RENAUD, of Amherstburg, Ont.
C. SMALE, chief engineer, Port Stanley, Ont.
ARCHIE GIBBS, second engineer, Corunna, Ont.
ROY McDONALD, wheelsman, Sarnia, Ont.
P. TITUS, fireman, Sarnia, Ont.
Capt. Theodore Dahlburg, of the Bradley Transportation company stone carrier Munson, said the vessel disappeared beneath the waves 13 miles northeast of Point Aux Barques so suddenly that he believed there had been an explosion aboard it. A heavy sea was running.
Capt. Dahlburg said the Munson reached the scene within 15 minutes, but he could find only scattered wreckage, and no survivors.
Harbor Beach Coast Guardsmen said the Lee grounded off Harbor Beach early Friday morning. A Coast Guard vessel released it about 11 a.m. Friday.
The speed of the Lee, about 10 miles an hour, would have placed it at the approximate location where the vessel disappeared at 4 p.m.
The Lee was owned by Captain T. B. Climie, of Sault, Ont. He said today the tug had been expected to reach winter quarters last night.
Capt. Climie sailed the tug, until August then returned to the Sault while the Lee remained in the vicinity of Sarnia. The owner said the tug was partially covered by insurance.
Captain Climie said he purchased the tug from the Sault Dredging company six years ago after it had been rebuilt. It was used as a harbor tug here, towing and dredging. The tug was used in the construction of the third Sault lock.

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