123

St. Paul, MN Tornado Hits Cities, Aug 1904

St Paul MN tornado 8-20-1904.jpg St Paul MN tornado 8-20-1904 2.jpg St Paul MN tornado 8-20-1904 3.jpg St Paul MN tornado 8-20-1904 4.jpg St Paul MN tornado 8-20-1904 7.jpg St Paul MN tornado 8-20-1904 8.jpg St Paul MN tornado 8-20-1904 6.jpg St Paul MN tornado 8-20-1904 5.jpg

DEATH AND DEBRIS.

TORNADO DEVASTATED WIDE SECTION IN TWIN CITIES.

TWELVE DEAD, FOUR DYING.

PROPERTY DAMAGE $1,000,000 -- CHIEFLY IN ST. PAUL BUSINESS DISTRICT.

TWO KILLED AND MANY INJURED BY DESTRUCTION OF TIVOLI THEATER, WHERE PERFORMANCE WAS IN PROGRESS -- TWO SPANS OF HIGH BRIDGE CRUSHED HOUSES BELOW, BUT INHABITANTS HAD ESCAPED -- STAMPEDE IN NEWSPAPER OFFICE.

St. Paul, Minn., AUg. 21. -- Death to twelve persons, injuries to many others, and destruction to property, both private and public, estimated, in round numbers, at $1,000,000 resulted from a furious gale which tore down the valley of the Mississippi at about 9 o'clock last night from a point somewhere near the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers, near Fort Snelling. At about that point the fury of the elements seemingly divided and with a roar descended on the twin cities and their environs.
The dead:
LORIN F. HOKANSON, killed at Tivoli Theater.
GEORGE KWENTON, killed at Tivoli Theater.
Unknown child, killed by falling walls of dormitory at House of the Good Shepherd.
RICHARD HILLISBECK, operator at Minneapolis Junction, killed by lightning.
Unknown woman.
ALBERT ODHE, killed at St. Louis Park, a suburb of Minneapolis.
Six-year-old son of FRANK HEDGES, killed at St. Louis Park.
Unknown girl, aged ten, killed at St. Louis Park.
Four unknown dead at Waconia, a small station twenty miles west of Minneapolis.
The missing:
EDWIN GILLERT, who was one of the last persons seen in the Tivoli Theater during the calamity.
The fatally injured:
WILLIAM LONGBY, skull fractured.
MRS. ROBERT YOUNGER, caught in collapsed house; injured internally.
Sister at the House of the Good Shepherd, name unknown; injured internally and body badly cut and bruised.
Unknown child, House of the Good Shepherd; buried beneath debris.
There are many others less seriously hurt.
Mayor R. A. Smith said today that he would issue a proclamation tomorrow calling a special meeting of the city council to provide aid for storm sufferers and for repairing the damage done to city property.
The mayor spent the entire day visiting the storm-stricken district of the city.
Beginning at a point below Fort Snelling, there is the first known evidence that the storm struck with damaging effect. It came from the southwest, and, howling in its fury, uprooted trees and demolished buildings in its pathway toward St. Paul.
The storm tore off two spans of the High Bridge as completely as if they had been unbolted from the rest of the structure and carted away by workmen.
There the bridge connected with the high bluffs at West St. Paul, and it is 180 feet above the river. This mass of steel was carried to the flats below, where flying steel girders and heavy planks fell on several small frame houses of the flat dwellers and crushed them completely. None of the occupants of these houses was hurt. They saw the storm coming and took refuge in the caves in the hillside, where they were safe.
The storm tore along the flats, uprooting trees on Harriet Island, and then struck this city at the Wabasha Street Bridge.
Underneath the debris of the Tivoli were found, when the storm had passed, the mangled bodies of LORIN F. HOKANSON, one of the employes in the concert hall, and GEORGE KWENTON, one of the audience.

Continued on Page 2.

123