Kansas City, MO (near) Train Plunges In River, July 1909

TRAIN PLUNGES INTO RIVER; SIX PERSONS KILLED.

WABASH ROADBED NEAR KANSAS CITY COLLAPSES.

LIST OF INJURED GIVEN AT 36; THREE MAY DIE.

FIVE CARS AND ENGINE HURLED INTO THE WATER -- EIGHT MAIL CLERKS CLIMB THROUGH UNROOFED COACH AND SWIM ASHORE.

Kansas City, Mo., July 26. -- (AP) -- Six lives were lost and thirty-six persons injured, three perhaps fatally, in the wreck of Wabash passenger train No. 4, when it plunged into the Missouri River, thirty miles east of here last night. The dead:
CHARLES FLOWER, engineer, Kansas City.
LOUIS BOND, fireman, Moberly.
HARRY ECKERT, baggageman, St. Louis.
DANIEL KING, 2 years old, Eldon, Mo.
CHARLES ANTHONY, laborer.
JESSE OLDHAM, laborer.
The seriously injured are:
MRS. C. F. MOORE, Pueblo, Colo.; suffered internal injuries; will recover.
FRANK GARDNER, Mt. Vernon, Ohio.
MRS. S. S. HACKETT, Orrick, Mo.
MISS IRENE DORTON, Orrick, Mo.
The train left Kansas City at 9 o'clock Saturday night and was due in St. Louis ten hours later. Of the eight cars which made up the train, five and the engine are now in the river, with the water covering all of them except one end of the Des Moines sleeper. A deadhead Pullman, mail car, baggage car, day coach and a sleeper followed the engine into the stream.
A chair car and two Pullmans remained on the track.
At the scene of the wreck the river makes a bend and the railroad follows it. For days the flood waters have been undermining the roadbed.
Three hours before the wreck a freight train of forty-five loaded cars passed the point safely.
When No. 4 started across the same bit of track, fifty feet of the roadbed suddenly collapsed. The train was running fourteen miles an hour, but the forward cars telescoped, allowing the three rear cars to stop so gradually that their occupants were hardly shaken.
The roof of the mail car was torn off and eight mail clerks clambered out and swam to shore.
In the Des Moines sleeper, E. T. KING was holding his little son when the crash came. The child was instantly killed and MR. KING was unconscious when found.
Dr. Turner Lohveck, a woman physician of St. Louis, was the heroine of the wreck, according to railroad officials and passengers. In thirty minutes she gave temporary treatment to twenty-seven injured persons, several women passengers assisting her by preparing bandages.
"It seems to me every woman there tore up her skirts for dressings," said Dr. Lohveck.
"Everything was freely given by the uninjured, and many emptied their baggage of wearing apparel. The eight mail clerks refused treatment until all the passengers were attended to."
"Soon after all the injured had been given temporary attention, relief came."
The engine of a local freight train which was just behind the wrecked passenger train, was attached to the three intact cars of the ill-fated train and all the passengers hurried to Kansas City. Thirty-one of the injured are now in a hospital here.

Los Angeles Herald California 1909-07-26