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Glen Park, MO Packet CITY OF SALTILLO Sinks, May 1910 - Harvest of Death

HARVEST OF DEATH ON RIVER PACKET.

CITY OF SALTILLO STRIKES ROCK AND SINKS IN MISSISSIPPI RIVER NEAR ST. LOUIS.

CREW'S HEROIC RESCUE.

"WOMEN AND CHILDREN FIRST," SHOUTS CAPTAIN, AND MEN RESPOND TO COMMAND.

St. Louis, May 13. -- Eleven persons, seven of whom were passengers, lost their lives Wednesday night in the Mississippi River at Glen Park, Mo., 24 miles below this city, when two hours leaving the St. Louis docks, the steamer City of Saltillo was dashed against a rock by the swift current and sunk to the bottom of the river.
Because of the loss of the passenger list and the uncertainty at the scene of the disaster, the extent of the death list was not definitely known until about noon yesterday.
Those still missing and almost sure to have perished in the accident are:
MISS ANNA RHEA, Nashville, Tenn.
MRS. ISAAC T. RHEA, Nashville, Tenn., recovered.
S. C. BAKER, first clerk of the steamer.
MRS. JOSEPH HARRIS, Nashville, Tenn.
MRS. ARCHIE PATTERSON, Savannah, Tenn.
ARCHIE PATTERSON, Savannah, Tenn.
ARCHIE PATTERSON, JR., 2 years old.
WILLIAM J. PICKETT, salesman, St. Louis.
FOWLER POST, third clerk.
MISS LENA WALL, Nashville, Tenn.
Head porter, name unknown.
Cabin boy, name unknown.
Only one body, that of MRS. RHEA has been recovered. The river is being dragged by the crew of the wrecked boat. MRS. RHEA was the wife and MISS ANNA RHEA the daughter of Isaac T. Rhea, president of the St. Louis and Tennessee Packet company, owners of the wrecked boat.
The boat carried 27 passengers, mostly women and children, and a crew of 80. She lft St. Louis at 7 o'clock with a heavy cargo, including cattle and live stock and the voyage was considered precarious because of the great amount of driftwood floating in the river due to the annual spring rise.
When the vessel struck and sank in 20 feet of water the greatest confusion prevailed. The noise of rending timbers, shrieks of woman and children and the bellowing of the cattle, mingled with the cries of the crew.
Passengers and members of the crew clung to the timbers, while those less fortunate lent their aid immediately to the rescue of the helpless. The rescued were taken to the Glencoe company's boarding house.
Glen Park is merely a river landing without wire facilities. Therefore Captain Crane after his escape from the river walked two miles to the nearest telephone station and sent the news to St. Louis and to De Soto. Rescue trains with physicians and relief supplies were sent out Thursday morning.

Lock Haven Express Pennsylvania 1910-05-13

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