St. Louis, MO Train Crashed Into Wagon, Jan 1892

ENDED IN DEATH.

FATAL TERMINATION OF A ST. LOUIS SLEIGH RIDE.

PARTY RUN DOWN BY A WABASH TRAIN.

NINE INSTANTLY KILLED AND A DOZEN OR MORE SERIOUSLY HURT - RESULT OF A DRUNKEN CAROUSER.

St. Louis, Jan. 20. - One of the most horrible and death dealing accidents that has ever occurred within the city limits took place at 10:45 o'clock last night when nine men were hurled into eternity, four more fatally hurt and eight others more or less injured by being run into by an excursion train on the Wabash road at the Sarah Street crossing.
The terrible catastrophe was the result, some say, of apparently careless driving on the part of one of the killed while others claim that the engineer was to blame.
The driver of the sleigh had charge of a party of 20 persons, members of the Clover Leaf Fishing Club and their guests who were returning from a café some distance out on the Clayton Road. Nearly all the party had been drinking during the evening, but the driver was sober. He was so muffled up, however, that he did not hear the approaching train, and could not see it from the fact that a short distance from the Sarah Street crossing there is a deep cut hiding the track.
He was driving rapidly and just as he was crossing the train dashed into the sleigh. The engine was running tender first. The men were thrown high in the air and scattered in all directions. Some fell on the south side of the track others on the top of the cab while another was found on the engine pilot.
The train consisting of an engine and single coach, conveyed a delegation of the Legion of Honor who were returning from Ferguson, where some exercises of the order had been held. When the train backed up the sight that met the gaze of those on the train was awful. The 20 injured men were piled up in hopeless confusion and groans and screams rent their air.
Four men were lifted from the mass and placed in the coach. Then the police and ambulances that had been telephoned for and arrived and the train proceeded on its way to the depot. The ambulance attendants lifted the dead and injured out of the snow and the latter were made as comfortable as possible. The night was very cold. The mercury being below zero and the injured as well as helpers suffered greatly on this account. After the wounded had been placed in the ambulances they were conveyed to the city hospital where the dead were removed to the morgue.
Engineer Blanchfield, says that he is not responsible for the accident as the bell was ringing, and he believes the men in the sleigh were so intoxicated that they did not know they were driving along the railroad track.
The list of the killed is as follows:
FREDERICK NEUBERT, bar keeper;
J. C. SCHIEFFLE, formerly of Chicago;
GUSTAVE NEUBERT, bar tender;
W. H. KRONE, salesman;
GEO. EDD, clerk;
E. VON EHREN, salesman;
AL MILLER, bar tender;
ANDY STEPHENSON, the driver;
An Unknown Man, believed to be a railroader.
The wounded are:
K. O. CHARLES FREY, both legs broken and terrible cut and bruised about the head and body;
JAMES BARRETT, slightly injured in breast;
R. H. BECKLEY, reported wounded and taken to his home;
A man about 20 years old, wearing a Royal Areanuss Badge, left arm cut off, skull fractured, terribly mangled and fatally injured;
CHAS. WILLARD, slightly cut and bruised;
LEWIS H. BRASSERT, 1528 Biddle, skull fractured;
JAMES CONNOR, slightly injured;
CHARLES KABRENS, 1829 Washington Street, badly hurt about the head.

The Akron Beacon Journal Ohio 1892-01-20