St. Louis, MO Terrific Tornado In St. Louis, Mar 1872

TERRIFIC TORNADO AT ST. LOUIS, YESTERDAY.

HALF OF A MARKET HOUSE BLOWN DOWN.

A NUMBER OF PEOPLE SERIOUSLY INJURED BY THE FALL.

TERRIFIC THUNDER-STORM -- A HOUSE BLOWN DOWN AND EIGHT PERSONS INJURED.

St. Louis, Mo., March 30. -- A very severe thunder and lightning storm passed over this city about 8 o'clock this evening, accompanied by heavy rain. During the storm a terrific tornado from the south-west struck a large brick market-house on Seventh street, between Spruce and Poplar, and leveled the northern half of it to the ground in the twinkling of an eye. Most of the roof, and several heavy timbers were carried across Seventh street, and, striking the building opposite, knocked two great holes in it, exposing the rooms. So far as now known only five persons were injured -- one, HENRY WILDE, a butcher, seriously, perhaps mortally. A woman, name unknown, had her leg badly crushed, and a man, name also unknown, had both arms broken. The stalls in the market-house were occupied, and a large number of persons were present making purchases, and it is wonderful that scores of them were not killed. Aside form slight damage done to one or two buildings, two or three blocks distant, no other destruction seems to have occurred. It is likely that the tornado struck the ground only at this point, rose again, and passed on in a north-eastern direction, and may be heard from at some point in Illinois to-morrow. Seventh street is blocked with debris. Parts of the market-house roof and awnings were carried two or three blocks distant.
Later -- The following are additional names of the injured, as far as can be learned to-night:
JOHN HECK, back severely hurt, causing paralysis in the lower part of the body; will probably die.
MRS. FLORI, compound fracture on the left lover leg; flesh badly lacerated.
EDWIN FLORI, internally hurt, and shoulder torn by a meat hook.
GEORGE WHITE, badly cut about the head; nose broken and right ankle dislocated.
HENRY LIPARDT, internally hurt.
JOHN BURGER, arm broken, bruised in various places.
Two or three others were bruised slightly.

The New York Times New York 1872-03-31

-------------------------------------------------------------

BODY OF A YOUNG MAN FOUND UNDER A DEMOLISHED ROOF.

St. Louis, March 31. -- The body of CHAS. W. DYER, of Toledo, Ohio, was found this afternoon under a portion of the roof which was blown from the market-house last night. DYER was a young man, sixteen years of age, who, in company with R. M. STREETER, his tutor, and one or two other gentlemen, had just arrived by a Missouri Pacific train, and was walking through the market-house on their way up-town, when the tornado struck the market-house. The party scattered, each seeking safety for himself. DYER rushed into Seventh street, and was overtaken by a large mass of metal roof, which struck him on the top of the head, crushing his skull, and evidently killing him instantly. A portion of the roof of the Vitriol factory, corner of Austin and Fourteenth streets, was blown off, and DENNIS DUNN, a workman, was badly wounded. Other damages in various points in the city are reported today, but none seriously. In East St. Louis, the roof of the round-house belonging to the Terre Haute Railroad was blown off. Several locomotives were somewhat injured, and JOHN MYERS and another man were wounded. The steamer H. C. Yeager and a ferry-boat in the harbor lost their chimneys, and the stermer North-western was blown across the river. The part of the market-house destroyed was about 150 feet long, 45 feet wide and 25 feet high. It will cost probably $10,000 to rebuild it. The loss to the butchers is about $10,000.

The New York Times New York 1872-04-01