Salvia, NV Freight Trains Collide, Nov 1893

Collision Wreckage

A HORRIBLE WRECK.

TWO FREIGHTS COLLIDE TWENTY-SIX MILES EAST OF RENO.

SIX MEN KILLED AND OTHERS WOUNDED -- A SICKENING SIGHT.

One of the worst train wrecks that ever happened on this division of the Central Pacific occurred yesterday one mile west of Salvia, a small station twenty-six miles east of Reno, between freight trains No. 10, west-bound, and No. 7, east-bound, resulting in the death of six men and the wounding of several others. No. 10, was manned by the following crew:
Engineer DAVID STRONG.
Fireman CHARLES GIVENS.
Conductor S. H. ROCKY.
Brakemen W. C. HINKLE and ED LEACH.
No. 7 had the following crew:
Engineer JAMES BIRD.
Fireman TOM MORSEHEAD.
Conductor GEORGE LA FORGE.
Brakemen T. O. BERRY and A. RIEVES.
The Trains Collided.
In a cut on a sharp turn in the road, rendering it impossible to see for any distance ahead. They were both running at a high rate of speed and came together with such force that the engine of No. 10 nearly changed places with that of No. 7, resulting in the death of ED LEACH, brakeman on the west-bound, and CHARLES GIVENS, fireman on the same train, and four tramps, who have not yet been identified, andinjuring several others. JAMES BIRD, engineer on No. 7, had his left leg broken at the ankle very severely and his recovery is doubtful. A tramp, VOE, was beating his way west. He says he is from Chicago and has a wife living there. Fourteen or fifteen cars were badly wrecked, five or six of them being smashed to kindling wood.
Brakeman LEACH was on the engine of his train, and was caught between the boiler head and tank. Both legs were crushed to a pulp, and caught in such a way that it was impossible to get him out. He lived about two hours after the collision, being perfectly conscious all the time, and begged his companions to kill him and end his sufferings. After death it was found necessary to cut off one leg close to the body, in order to exticate the body from the wreck.
The tramps killed were in a box car close to the front end of train No. 10, traveling west, and were picked out of the debris, shortly after the accident.
The injured, JAMES BIRD, T. O. BERRY, CHARLES GIVERS, TOM MORSEHEAD and VOS, the tramp, were taken back to Wadsworth. DRS. THOMAS and BEGSTEIN and DR. HARMONY of Wadsworth were promptly on the scene and accompanied the injured to Wadsworth. Fireman GIVENS lived but a half hour after arriving there, but long enough for his father, mother, little brother and sister to see him before he died. Their grief was painful to witness. GIVENS, however, seemed to be unconscious of his surroundings. He was taken in the depot and laid on an operating table to undergo the operation of amputation of his leg which was badly smashed; the doctors, however, seeing that death was close at hand, did not perform the operation, and in a few minutes he was dead.
The doctors then immediately went to JAMES BIRD, whose leg was so badly broken at the ankle that the bones protruded, and after an examination concluded that they might be able to save the foot. They then devoted their attention to VOS, the injured tramp, and afterward to BERRY and MORSEHEAD, who were but slightly injured.
The cause of the accident was a misunderstanding of orders, which will take an official inquest to fix the blame. Superintendent JERRY WHITED was promptly on the scene of the collision, with wrecking crews and trains from Wadsworth and Truckee, and succeeded in clearing the track for the passage of trains about 10:30 o'clock this morning.

Reno Evening Gazette Nevada 1893-11-06