Eatontown, NJ Train Wreck, Jun 1906

As soon as the residents of Eatontown heard of the accident many automobile parties hurried to the scene. Most of the wounded were taken away in these machines. Many physicians volunteered their services, and the injured were cared for in the homes in the vicinity of the wreck.

Charles Freedman of Lakewood got out of the combination car with one ear almost torn from his head. He jumped in an automobile and got to the nearest telephone to tell his wife that he was all right. Then he submitted to having his ear sewed on again.

Mesloh, the musician, was unconscious when taken from the car in which he was found. There was a deep wound in his chest. He was carried to the hospital at Long Branch along with two other passengers who were bleeding freely from cuts. Mesloh, was the only person kept at the hospital. His condition was so serious that it was thought inadvisable to move him to this city.

Among the passengers who had wounds dressed by the physicians, and were later, brought to New York on a special relief train, were: F. Peabody, 634 Hamburg Avenue, Brooklyn; Edgar Devoe, Fulton Street, New York; Richard Thomas, Lakewood; Mrs. H. Bihle, New York; the Rev. J. M. Halleck, Brooklyn; W. B. Maloney, New York; Caroline Gowdy, Toms River; the Rev. E. C. Hancock, Perth Amboy; W. A. Dunlap, Chicago; Floyd B. Wilson, New York; John Kurnell, Brooklyn; Frederick Davidson, Brooklyn; Samuel Tanhuser, Lakewood; H. J. Terwilger, Lakewood; L. Constantino, Lakewood; C. C. Freeman, Lakewood; Mrs. A. Dunlop, Chicago; Hugo Supper, Lakewood; Adolph Ernst, Toms River, and J. E. McDevitt, Lakewood.

The same engine that was wrecked yesterday went into Newark Bay a year ago.

The wife of George W. Van Duzer, who was killed in the wreck, left her home, at 221 West 133d Street, yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock to go to a grocery store near by. Her husband, who was one of the Elite Musical Four, vaudeville players, had finished a week's engagement at Atlantic City on Sunday night, and she knew that he was coming home on the train.

At the corner Mrs. Van Duzer saw a man reading a paper. The headlines showed that the express had been wrecked. She ran to a newsstand. Her husband's name headed the list of injured. Friends took her home. Last night she went with several friends and relatives to Eatontown to bring back the body.

Van Duzer was born twenty-eight years ago in Hackettstown, N. J., and he was educated in the High School there. He was considered a musical genius as a child, and his family gave him a musical education. He was the composer of several musical pieces, the best known being, "Fascination" and "Sarnia," two marches. He was to have begun an engagement in New York this week.

The New York Times, New York, NY 12 Jun 1906

Comments

Eatontown train tracks

The Jersey Central RR used to run from the still-existing "Southern Division" tracks west of Eatontown, came through the center of town, and continued east through Oceanport, past Monmouth Park Racetrack and headed north up what is now the "new" Ocean Ave. in Long Branch. This route was abandoned by the late 1960's, but there's still plenty of evidence of its existence along the old ROW.

Eatontown train tracks

The Jersey Central RR used to run from the still-existing "Southern Division" tracks west of Eatontown, came through the center of town, and continued east through Oceanport, past Monmouth Park Racetrack and headed north up what is now the "new" Ocean Ave. in Long Branch. This route was abandoned by the late 1960's, but there's still plenty of evidence of its existence along the old ROW.

Frieght Wreck

There s an enormous freight train wreck from Shrewsbury Ave bridge to Tinton Ave bridge to Lewis Street
in the early 1950's. I lived in Eatontown and heard it
at night, saw the twisted and derailed cars and have
photos from the next day.

being born & raised in NJ in

being born & raised in NJ in this area all of my live there never were or not now any train tracks in Eatontown ,NJ. The nearest train tracks would be in Little Silver or Oceanport. Strange article.