Ossining, NY Bus Crashes, July 1934

13 BURN TO DEATH AS BUS CRASHES AT OSSINING, NEW YORK.

SCREAMING PASSENGERS WITH CLOTHES BLAZING FIGHT WAY OUT OF WINDOWS OF VEHICLE.

GAS TANK EXPLODES, KEEPS RESCUERS BACK.

12 BODIES TAKEN FROM EMBERS; ONE DIES AT HOSPITAL.

Ossining, N.Y., July 22 -- (AP) -- Thirteen Brooklyn men and women were burned to death and 26 were injured today when a bus carrying them to a Sing Sing prison baseball game plunged down a 25-foot embankment and trapped them in a sheath of flame.
Screaming passengers, their clothing ablaze, fought their way out of broken windows after the gas tank exploded, igniting the bus and a large lumber yard into which it had toppled.
Some were frantically hauled to safety by onlookers but the flames engulfed the bus so rapidly that rescuers were forced back.
Twelve bodies, all seared, were taken to morgues as soon as the wreckage cooled. Another woman died in Ossining Hospital of burns.
The identified dead, so far:
MRS. ROSE THOMPSON, 40, of 9 Woodbine Street, Brooklyn.
MRS. WILLIAM HAYES, 27 Cornelius Street, Brooklyn.
WILLIAM MURRAY, SR., 15 Cornelius Street, Brooklyn.
JOSEPH McDONALD.
CATHERINE McDONALD, his wife.
BERNADETTE McDONALD, aged 12, their daughter.
ARTHUR LUFF.
JOSEPH MEANEY and his sister (first name not known.)
FRANK IMPERATORE.
JAMES MURRAY and his wife (first name not known).
MR. and MRS. ABE GELLER.
JOHN McNICHOLAS.
Unidentified man believed to be one of the club's baseball team.
The bus, last in a procession of seven carrying a gay party of young Democratic league members and their friends picked the wrong road as it entered Ossining.
With its passengers singing and laughing, it sped up a long ramp over the New York Central railroad tracks. At a sudden right turn the heavily laden vehicle swerved and crashed through a rail fence.
Four passengers, sensing disaster, jumped through the windows just before the bus hurtled down the sheer drop.
The songs changed to screams as the vehicle landed right side up in the midst of piles of lumber.
There was a sharp report and flaming gasoline spurted up.
Before the panic-stricken men and women could climb from their seats the entire bus was in flames. The first few to escape ran to the Hudson River 25 feet distant and jumped in to extinguish their flaming clothing.
Others rolled on the ground as spectators rushed from the station platform to aid in the rescue work. In a few minutes the blazing roof of the bus collapsed and prevented the firemen from taking out the other passengers.

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