Buffalo, NY Factory Fire, Dec 1880

BUFFALO'S BLAZE.

TEN PERSONS LOSE THEIR LIVES IN THE BURNING OF THE GREAT WALL PAPER FACTORY.

HALF A MILLION DOLLARS GOES UP IN FIRE AND SMOKE.

Buffalo, N.Y., December 18. -- 1 a.m. -- A big fire began here at six o'clock last evening in W. H. Bridge & Son's wall paper factory, inflicting great damage before it was extinguished. The fire was discovered just before work was stopped, and fifteen minutes later the whole large five-story building was a sheet of flames, and half an hour later the building was level with the ground. The firm employed eighty men and two hundred boys, and the factory was one of the largest in the country, and the only one outside of the wall paper pool.
The following is a list of those known to be killed:
One of the foremen in the fifth story badly burned and leaped to the ground; unrecognizable; his head and body mashed to a jelly; supposed to be THOMAS FIELDS.
JOHN MALONE, aged 15, jumped from the fifth story; killed.
WILLIAM BERRY, fatally injured in the head, spine and inwardly; jumped from the fourth story.
JOHN GRIFFIN, jumped from the fourth floor; right arm broken and badly injured internally.
MOSES MALONE, leg fractured; jumped from the fifth story; fatally hurt.
PATRICK O'BRIEN, badly burned about the head and back, and arm broken.
ED McCORMICK, jumped from the fifth floor; badly cut on the head.
JOSEPH MALONE, brother of John Malone, jumped from the fifth floor; fractured leg and broken arm; fatally hurt.
MIKE O'BRIEN, right leg broken.
The following are missing and supposed to be in the ruins:
STEPHEN HACKETT.
MARTIN McGEE.
PETER SWARDER.
JOHN STOUL.
JAMES STOUL.
JAY VOLTZ.
The loss of the Messrs. Bridge will amount to $250,000, and is partially covered by insurance. The building was valued at $80,000. The flames communicated to Manning's Queen City malt house, a brick building, valued at $50,000, which was completely destroyed. The engine house of fire steamer No. 10 was also destroyed. Several stores, with their contents, were more or less damaged.
The majority of the boys who escaped from the paper factory, got out with only their shirts and trousers and shoes on.

Omaha Daily Bee Nebraska 1880-12-18