Cambridge, OH Trolley Cars Collide, Feb 1908

CARS COLLIDE ON TRESTLE NEAR CAMBRIDGE; ONE KILLED AND SCORE INJURED.

MR. J. H. SMITH OF THIS CITY, WITNESSES DISTRESSING SCENES AND ASSISTS THE INJURED.

Cambridge, O., Feb. 24. -- More than a score of people were seriously hurt, some, it is thought, fatally, in the wreck on the interurban road Sunday morning.
ROSE CLANCEY, aged 18, of Guernsey Mines, was instantly killed.
The performance "Coming Through the Rye" had just closed at the Colonial theatre, when the crowd jammed both the Byesville interurban and city car, the former taking the lead. Just after passing the city limits on the south there is a steep grade, and while going down this rapidly, a drunken passenger, it is alleged, who was on the rear platform of the Byesville car, pulled off the trolley and the car was brought to a stop on a trestle alongside the Cambridge Glass Plant Works. The motorman on the city car following did not see that the car ahead was standing still until too late, and when the crash came he was thrown headlong between the cars.
Five people who were standing on the platform were crushed by the timbers and one was thrown 30 feet into the creek below. But the car remained on the track. Conductor McCULLEY, on the city car, though injured, ran to the city and notified traction company authorities, and a special car with physicians was hurried to the scene.
Heroic work was done in disengaging the injured, who were brought to the city and taken to the hospital or their homes in ambulances.
One victim, CATHERINE CLANCEY, although both legs were crushed never uttered a moan and witnessed her sister's death without losing her remarkable nerve. Her injuries were thought to be fatal, but because of her courage physicians say she will live.
MR. J. H. SMITH of 44 Wilson Street, this city, was a witness of the distressing scene following the dreadful street car accident at Cambridge Saturday night. MR. SMITH was visiting relatives at that place and took a city car to the East End at shortly after 11 o'clock. It was the car ahead of him, on the same line, that met with the fatal accident. He discribed the scene as one of horror. Passengers from the car on which the Newark man was riding, were thrown into a panic but soon realized the situation and combined their efforts with the uninjured occupants of the first car, toward assisting the injured persons to places of safety.

The Newark Advocate Ohio 1908-02-24