Bolivar, OH Derailment Of Passenger Train, Dec 1890

BAD WRECK IN OHIO.

TRAIN GOES THROUGH A TRESTLE NEAR BOLIVAR, O., AND FOUR PASSENGERS LOSE THEIR LIVES.

Massillon, O., Dec. 19. -- A terrible disaster occurred at Bolivar, O., on the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad, Thursday afternoon, only two of the fourteen occupants of the rear car of the south-bound mail train escaping serious injury. The train, composed of two coaches and a baggage car, was approaching Bolivar. About a mile north of town the front truck of the last car left the track just as the engine started across a long trestle, thirty-five feet from the ground. Almost before the fact that anything was wrong could be known the locomotive was dashing across the bridge, the rear car bounding along on the ties. When fairly on the bridge it swung around and toppled over, falling to the ground bottom upward. The coupling connecting this car with the remainder of the train snapped like a thread and the air brake thus suddenly put on sent the people in the forward coach crushing against the seats.
The following persons were killed:
Unknown woman, crushed beyond recognition.
MISS ADA HALL, of Sherrodsville, badly mangled.
HENRY HILL and sister CARRIE, of Shelby, Illinois, burned to a crisp.
The injured:
W. G. GRAHAM, of Norwalk, crushed and back broken, will die.
CHARLES CONRAD, of Massillon, O., internally injured, probably fatally.
Conductor FRED LANDIS, seriously.
LEONARD WHITMAN, of Marietta, leg broken.
MRS. LOUISA PIPER, of Stark County, O., internally.
IRA COWAN, of Norwalk, badly bruised.
WILLIAM GORLINGER, of Ada, Oklahoma.
WILLIAM HALL, of Sherrodsville, back injured.
The scene in the ravine, the car a complete wreck, its trucks in the air and the flames bursting from the debris, is described by those who saw it as something frightful. Robert Cowan, a brakeman and one of the two men who escaped uninjured, best realized the situation. After crawling from his dangerous position he at once gathered up loose snow and began to pilt it about the stove. In this, he was soon assisted by W. E. Tingle, a traveling man from Zanesville, and between them they smothered the flames.

Logansport Reported Indiana 1890-12-19