Royalton, PA Army Plane Crashes, Jan 1929

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EIGHTH DEATH OCCURS FROM PLANE CRASH.

GIANT ARMY MONOPLANE MASS OF WRECKAGE AT MIDDLETOWN AIR DEPOT.

PILOT WANTED TO DIE.

HACKSAWS USED TO TAKE DEAD AND INJURED FROM DEBRIS; MISHAP AT ROYALTON.

Harrisburg, Pa., Jan 12 - In sharp contrast to the great endurance achievement of its sister ship, the
"Question Mark," a great Army tri-motor plane was piled up today as a mass of junk in the Army storehouse at the Middletown air depot near here, after having plunged to earth after a short flight, carrying to their deaths eight Army airmen. The eighth soldier, Sergeant PATRICK CONROY, died in a hospital here at 1:50 A.M. this morning.
The plane, which had just taken off from the Army field at Middletown, crashed yesterday several miles away, in the garden of a home at Royalton.
Townspeople found the pilot, Lieut.
ROBERT ANGELL, wedged in the wreckage of the plane. Hacksaws were used to cut him lose. Then, in the lowermost part of the wreckage were found piled the seven other men. Five were dead.
Lieutenant ANGELL wanted to die.
"Shoot me men, for God's sake," rescuers said he cried in his pain.
He died a short while later in a hospital. Sergeant MIKE KELLEY, too, died soon after his removal to a hospital.
The men who had been killed instantly in the plane's crash were Sergeant HENRY CROMAN, Sergeant JAMES McCARTHY, Sergeant RUDOLPH LAHUTTA and Privates SAMUEL P. JONES and CLARENCE BUCH.
The bodies now are in a Middletown morgue, awaiting disposition of Army authorities.
Why the plane crashed is not known.
Royalton residents, accustomed to hearing the drone of airplane motors over their heads as planes fly past to the air depot, noticed that the ill-fated ship's motors
"were making a terrible racket."
The big tri-motored Fokker was flying low. The pilot appeared to be trying to force it higher to increase the chances of gliding to a safe landing if its motors should fail.
Then it slid over on its side and dashed to the ground, one wing hitting a tree.
An official investigation already has been started.
Two men can be thankful today that they "ferried" another plane back to Washington, instead of returning in the plane in which they had flown to Middletown earlier in the day.
Captain Harry Dinger, who had piloted the big ship to Middletown from Bolling Field, Washington, flew back with Sergeant Charles Nailes, a passenger on the trip to Middletown, in an Army Amphibian Plane, leaving Lieutenant ANGELL to fly the Fokker home.
The trip to Middletown had been made for the purpose of taking supplies to Bolling Field.

Mount Carmel Item Pennsylvania 1929-01-12