Analomink, PA Train Wreck, Aug 1910

Analomink, PA Train Wreck, Aug 1910 Analomink, PA Train Wreck, Aug 1910 Analomink, PA Train Wreck, Aug 1910

TWO DEAD; TWO HURT

Result of Train Wreck Near Stroudsburg, Pa.

Stroundsburg, Pa., August 6. -- A freight wreck, in which two men met death and two others were badly injured, occurred at Analomink, on the Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western Railroad, about four miles north of this place yesterday. The dead are George Coglizer, of Scranton, engineer; W. J. Ryan, Scranton, brakeman. Injured: John Benton, Binghamton, N. Y., scalp badly cut and terribly bruised; Thomas Cannon, flagman, of Scranton, shoulder dislocated and body bruised.

The cause of the wreck was the running away of the train, composed of sixty-two loaded cars, on the Pocono Mountains, the steepest grade on the road. The air on the engine gave out, and the engineer could not hold the train. The train at times ran at a rate of a mile a minute. There are thirty-seven cars burning in a narrow cut, and a half-mile away there are nineteen more cars piled up and the wrecked engine.

The loss to the railroad will run up into many thousands of dollars.

Richmond Times Dispatch, Richmond, VA 7 Aug 1910

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HERO WAS A HOBO.

Wreck Which Exposed Cheap Valuation of Trainmen's Lives

Scranton, Pa., Sept. 2. -- This is the story of a hobo who paid for his ride on the freight train -- a wild ride on the axle of a car rushing ninety mile an hour down the mountain side -- a ride that ended in wreck, in the death for two trainmen and in the heroship for the hobo.

Also this wreck may result in exposure of two phases of modern railroading -- overloading of trains and cheap valuation of trainmen's lives.

Sixty-one loaded freight cars started out behind a Lackawanna engine over the Pocono mountain route from Scranton to New York City. On a grade of over eighty feet to the mile the train ran away. Then something slipped and thirty-four freight cars piled up in total wreck of the engine. Fire did the rest. Fifteen more cars were partially destroyed.

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