St. Lawrence River, QB Sinking of the Liner EMPRESS OF IRELAND, May 1914

Empress Of Ireland Empress Of Ireland The Stordtadt after hitting Empress of Ireland Memorial To The Dead Empress of Ireland at the bottom of the St. Lawrence

THE EMPRESS OF IRELAND SINKS AT SEA.

800 SOULS LOST IN TERRIBLE DISASTER.

BIG C.P.R. EMPRESS RAMS COLLIER STORSTAD GOES DOWN BEFORE AID COULD REACH HER.

PASSENGER LIST OF 1200, MANY OF THEM WESTERNERS -- BOATS COLLIDED AND THE BIG STEAMER SANK ALMOST 10 MINUTES AFTER IMPACT -- LAURENCE IRVING, ACTOR, ABOARD.

Quebec, May 29. -- Eight hundred lives are believed to have been lost when the C.P.R. liner Empress of Ireland was in a collision at 2:30 this morning off Father Point during a dense fog.
She sank ten minutes after the collision.
First news was received in an S.O.S. call to Father Point and it was known that the vessel could not be far from Rimouski as she only left Quebec yesterday afternoon. Out of twelve hundred souls on board, many were westerners including several Winnipeg passengers.
The disaster will rank with terrible stories both in the matter of its suddenness and the number of victims.
The list of the latter is not yet known, but the passenger list included LAURENCE IRVING, the English actor, who recently finished a tour of Canada with his London theatrical company.
The Empress boats are fitted with splendid watertight compartments and compact, and the collision must have been a greata force to bring it to so sudden an end. It has been suggested that the vessel must have been cut in two.
The collier Storstad also appears to have sunk, but nothing is known of the number of her crew.
Immediately on receipt of the S.O.S. signal the C.G.S. Eureka and the mail tender Lady Lourne from Father Point hurried to the rescue. Early news of the disaster was meagre, barely more than the S.O.S. call came from the ship and of her immediate sinking.
The absence of wireless calls is now explained by the fact that the vessel sank almost at once.
At earliest dawn boats could be seen from the coast hovering over the spot but there was no sign of the two steamers. Shortly after six o'clock the first of the rescued were brought to Rimouski, three hundred and thirty-seven in all.
The dense fog at the time of collision may have been the cause of some of the life boats pulling out of sight of disaster and it is possible that more may be rescued.
The Empress of Ireland had been chosen for the passage of many of the Canadian members of the Salvation Army, who had arranged to attend the conference in London. Head among them were Commander REESE and MRS. REESE, Field Secretary COLGASTON and MRS. COLGASTON, Secretary Col. MAIDENT, Major and MRS FINDLAY. Altogether the Salvation Army party consisted of about 35 members. The Empress of Ireland was in command of Captain KENDALL R.N. who was formerly commander of Montrose and the man who captured the murderer Crippen. A late message states that Captain KENDALL is among those saved.

Quebec, May 29. -- The Empress of Ireland was launched of Govan on the Clyde, January 27, 1912. She was built for the Montreal, Quebec and Liverpool trade. The vessel had the same launching weight as the Empress of Britain, which is the largest ever put into the Clyde from the Fairfield yards, and in every other respect was an exact duplicate of that magnificent ocean liner.
Everything that science and art of ship building had devised and the safety and comfort of passengers could suggest, had been here embodied. The accommodation for travellers was both luxurious and extensive. On and above the main deck could be accommodated 310 first class, 170 second and 500 third class passengers and 270 steerage passengers on the lower deck forward. Then much space was devoted to cargo, and special arrangements were made for carrying frozen meat and refrigerating appliance. There were in all eight decks, and long, spacious promenades -- prepared against all kinds of weather -- extended for the greater length of the ship, in one case running aft to the stern. The stateroom arrangements, were the outstanding features, large, airy and comfortable, and the dining rooms were finished in sumptuous style. There were smoking rooms, music rooms, libraries, social halls and cafes, in every state furnished and upholstered with lavish attention to comfort. There was a complete installation of electric light and generating plant as well as wireless telegraph installation. The propelling machinery consisted of two sets of quadruple engines, and was of sufficient horsepower to maintain average speed of 18 knots an hour at sea. Nine boilers generated the steam, with a total of sixty furnaces. The parts, the fittings and appliances were of the most modern description.

Montreal, May 29. --Capt. WALSH, superintendent of the Empress line, said the boat would have to be damaged in two compartments before she would sink. He did not think there was any possibility of the vessel going down unless she was badly damaged indeed. Shortly after three a.m. Captain WALSH called his Quebec office by telephone and ordered a wireless call sent to the Empress to be replied to both at Quebec and Montreal. Up to 4:30 no response had been received from the Empress.
At 4:45 a.m., the G.N.W. received the following message from Father Point: "Daylight is breaking and I see several life boats, the government steamer Eureka and coal steamers in the distance but no trace of the Empress of Ireland or the Storstadt."
"The Eureka seems to be in the centre of the life boats." -- Signed, J. McWILLIAMS, Operator.

LATEST AND MOST GRAPHIC ACCOUNT OF EMPRESS DISASTER -- LOSS 1000.
Rimouski, May 29. -- Probably more than a thousand lives and surely not less than seven hundred, were lost when the great Canadian Pacific liner Empress of Ireland sank before dawn today in the St. Lawrence river, ripped open from amidships to stern by the Danish collier Storstad.
This was the estimate made this afternoon where the hysterical survivors, many of them pitiably maimed and almost naked, were being brought ashore. It was based on the fact that the Empress carried 1437 persons all told of whom 399 were rescued and landed here by the ships Eureka and Lady Evelyn. The Storstad, at first reported to have more than 300 survivors on board, has sailed for Quebec after landing only a handful of rescued and a number of dead.
Of those saved, crew members and third class passengers predominated. From partial lists available at two o'clock it was evident that but a mere sprinkling of the first cabin passengers were saved. Only three names of those in the cabins appeared in the preliminary lists of rescued. They were C. G. HENDERSON and G. R. BURT, address unstated, and WULTOR FENTON of Manchester, England.
The stricken vessel sunk as if she were lead. An explosion, apparently originating in her engine room, hastened her end, and those persons who were able to make their way from their cabins found themselves on a slanting deck. Many leaped and were drowned. Others were fortunate enough to grasp driftwood or wreckage and were picked up by lifeboats. It was apparent that the great hole torn in the ship's side admitted such a deluge of water that many muct have been overcome in their beds.
The rescued, fighting their way to the lifeboats from the careening deck, clinging desperately to the rails or leaping blindly overboard, broke their arms or legs or otherwise injured themselves so badly that twenty-two died after being picked up, groaning and in some cases insensible. Others were landed here while the populace of the village gathered with medicines and stimulants to relieve their sufferings.
A special train was made up this afternoon on which many were taken to Quebec and Montreal.
The president of the Canadian Pacific Railroad issued a statement this afternoon saying that the Empress had sunk within fourteen minutes. No one on board had time to sieze his belongings, much less to dress. Those found in the lifeboats were in their night clothes. The women suffered most. Only a few were saved, according to the early lists, and indications are that they lacked the strength to combat the conditions which confronted them. There was not, as was the case in the Titanic, time for calm deliberations and rigid observance of that unwritten rule of the sea, "women first." A party of Salvation Army members enroute to London was almost wiped out. LAURENCE IRVING, son of the late Sir HENRY IRVING, is among the missing, and other prominent persons in the first cabin were unaccounted for late this afternoon.
When the rescue ships Eureka and Lady Evelyn reached the scene shortly before daybreak, they found nine lifeboats from the Empress all crammed full and many of the occupants wounded. It was still dark. Wreckage covered the tiver everywhere. The Storstad, her bow badly crumpled, was still on the scene picking up the living wherever she could. In one of the lifeboats crouched Capt. KENDALL, commander of the Empress, dazed and greatly shaken. He had leaped from the deck and had been picked up by members of his crew. Those in the first and second cabins known to have been saved up to three o'clock this afternoon are:
G. W. S. HENDERSON; C. R. BURT; W. FENTON; MISS ALICE LEE, Nassau; MISS E. COURT, Liverpool, Eng.; WALTER ERZINGER, Winnipeg; B. WEINRUCH, Montreal; R. GRELLIN, Silverton, B.C.; W. BARRIE, Silverton, B.C.; S. W. HUDSON, Montreal; H. NEVILLE, London, Eng.; MRS. H. NEVILLE, London, Eng.
When the train came from the wharf bearing survivors it was a pitiful sight to see. Most of them were very little clothed. Many had to be carried bodily. One woman had a broken leg and shoulder and a man had both legs broken. Both were carried to the hotel opposite the station. P. R. O'HARA and his little girl HELEN were saved, but up to the present no news of MRS. O'HARA has been received. She probably drowned.
A young Englishman said that when the ship was struck by the collier the shock was terrific. He was asleep in his cabin. He jumped from bed, put on a dressing gown, went directly to wake up two of his friends, telling them he thought the ship was sinking. He then went on deck and came back a second time to see if his friends had left their cabin, but in his excitement he went in the wrong direction. The ship then was sinking so fast that he could hardly stand. He took hold of a rope in the side of the ship and swung into a life boat. He said he had not seen his friends and fears they were drowned.
Very few women and children were saved. They were asleep in their cabins when the ship sank and the accident occurred so quickly that they could not be rescued.
One woman who was garbed only in a vest, jumped overboard and swam to the Lady Evelyn. She was so exhausted, however, that she died a few minutes after she was taken from the water. Her identity has not been established.
Both the first and second Marconi operators of the Empress were saved. EDWARD BAMFORD, the second operator, was coming on duty when the boat began to sink. He caught the Father Point Marconi station and called for assistance. BOMFORD was saved by falling into a lifeboat. The other operator, RONALD FERGUSON, had to swim for the boat. Both operators came back to the Rimouski port on board the piilot boat Eureka.
Passengers were lound in their praise of the captain and the pilot of the Lady Evelyn and Captain SELUNGER of the Eureka, and their crews. All of them displayed the greatest bravery, it was declared. A MR. McWILLIAMS of Father Point, also was active in aiding the rescued. All of the authorities of Rimouski and Father Point joined in caring for the survivors.
G.W.S. HENDERSON, of Montreal, who is among the Empress of Ireland survivors, telegraphed his firm this afternoon giving the number of dead at 1030.
At low tide today the tip of the Empress of Ireland's funnels could be seen. She is lying in the channel. It is thought by navigators that it may be possible to raise her. At present the wreck is a menace to navigation.

Winnipeg, May, 29. -- W. C. CASEY, western manager of the Empress line, says four or five Winnipeg passengers and about 100 westerners all told were on the Empress.
Names Of Those On The Empress:
Commissioner and MRS. REESE.
Field Secretary Col. GASKIN and wife.
Field Secretary Col. MAIDMENT and wife.
Staff hand composed of officers from headquarters at Toronto consisting of about twenty-eight members, including Captain McGRATH. The handmaster is Adjutant HAMMING.
Adjutant BECKSTED, of Grace Hospital, Winnipeg.
Brigadier SCOTT HOTLER, financial secretary at Toronto.
Brigadier WALKER, Editor Canadian War Cry, Torondo.
Major and MRS. DAVID CREIGHTON, of the Immigration department.
Major and MRS. FINDLAY, Winnipeg.
Major and MRS. HOWELL, manager of the Printing Department of Toronto.
Major TURLIS, manager of the Trade Department, Toronto.
Major FRANK MORRIS, divisional commander of the London Division.
Staff Capt. ARTHUR MORRIS, brother of Major Morris, Toronto.
Staff Captain McAMMOND, late of Winnipeg.
Staff Captain HAYES, commanding officer of Temple Corps, Toronto.
Staff Captain GOODWIN, commanding officer Ottawa No. 1 Corps.
Adjutant BRICE, matron Hamilton Rescue Home.
Adjutant EDWARDS, Men's Serial Department, Ottawa.
Ensign PEACOCK, Clagary, a sister of Staff Captain Peacock of Winnipeg.
Ensign KUNDSON.
Capt. RUTH REESE, daughter of Commissioner and Mrs. Reese.
The saloon passenger list of the Empress of Ireland was:
J. R. ABERCROMBIE, Vancouver.
P. J. ABIE, Birmingham.
MRS. ADIE, Birmingham.
A. B. ANDERSON, London.
P. C. AVERDIECK, Manchester.
A. E. BARLOW and wife, Montreal.
MRS. HART BENNETT, Nassau.
MRS. W. R. BLOOMFIELD, Auckland, N.Z.
Lieut.-Col. W. R. BLOOMFIELD, Auckland, N.Z.
V. G. BRANDON, Manchester.
A. J. BURROWS.
HARWOOD CASH and wife, Gottingham.
J. J. CANILANI, Hamilton.
MISS C. A. CAY, Golden, B.C.
MISS WANETA CRALZERN, Montreal.
MRS. F. W. CULLEN, Toronto.
MISS MAUD CULLEN, Toronto.
Master CULLEN, Toronto.
R. A. CUNNINGHAM, Winnipeg.
M.D. A. DARLING, London.
J. FERGUS, Duncan, London.
MRS. F. H. LUNVEY, Denver.
COXE EDWARDS, Yokohama.
W. FENTON, Winchester.
MISS DORIS GAUNT, Birmingham.
E. P. GODSON, Kingston.
CHARLES GOLDTHORPE, Bradford, Eng.
Following is the list of second cabin passengers on the Empress of Ireland:
MRS. A. S. M. HAFFEY, Winnipeg.
MISS M. ATKINS, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.
MISS D. BALCOLM, Vancouver.
MISS A. BALES, Toronto.
MRS. W. D. BARBOUR, Silverton, B.C.
MISS BARBOUR, Silverton, B.C.
ALFRED BARBER, Saskatoon, Sask.
MISS BESSIE BAWDEN and MISS FLORENCE BAWDEN, Millsboro, Ind.
MISS MARY BAXTER, Toronto.
EDWARD BEALE, London, Ont.
MISS B. MERRY, Vancouver.
HENRY BICKETT, Carstairs.
G. D. BISHOP, Vancouver.
MISS I. BLAKSHURST, Paris, Ont.
MR. and MRS. J. W. BLACK, Ottawa, Ont.
MISS EDITH BERES and REINHOLDT BERES, Rochester, Minn.
MRS. F. E. BERLUTON, St. Thomas, Ont.
Q. BROWN, Kenora, Ont.
MR. COSTAHULAR, Regina, Sask.
R. B. BULPITT, Vancouver.
MRS. S. BURGESS, Hamiilton, Ont.
ALEX BUNTROME, Santa Barbara, California.
E. BRYNE, Brisbane.
MRS. BRYNE and MRS. G. N. BRYNE, Brisbane.
E. CAUGHREY and MRS. CAUGHREY, Ottawa.
MRS. E. C. HIGNELL, Victoria, B. C.
MRS. WM. CLARK, MISS NELLIE CLARK, Toronto.
A. COLE, Princeton, B.C.
MISS N. COURT, Liverpool, Eng.
MRS. M. DALE and child, Toronto.
O. F. DANDY, Pierson, Man.
WM. DAVIES and MRS. DAVIES, Toronto.
A. H. DEATH, Regina, Sask.
MRS. J. ELENSLIE, Mooselnin.
K. ERSINGER, Wininipeg.
MISS K. FARR, MISS N. FARR, MISS D. FARR and MISS B. FARR, Moose Jaw, Sask.
J. M. FINLE, Liverpool, England.
MRS. JOHN FISHER, Chicago.
P. E. FORD, Winnipeg.
H. FREEMAN and MRS. FREEMAN, Westallis, Wis.
MRS. M. GRAY and MISS W. GRAY, Terre Haute, Wis. (Transcriber's note: Indiana ??)
MR. and MRS. JAMES GREGG, Chilliwack, B.C.
MRS. W. G. GRIFF and child, Cloverdale, B.C.
MRS. J. HAKKER and MISS JUDITH HAKKER, Winnipeg.
C. HALLIDAY, Pierson, Man.
WILLIAM HART, Mortlach, Sask.
MRS. HART and M. W. HART.
H. L. HEATH and J. R. HEATH, Chicago.
MRS. M. K. HEPBURN, Vancouver,
MISS B. M. HEPBURN, MASTER H. E. HEPBURN, MRS. ROBT. HUGGAN, Nanaimo, B.C.
MISS F. HOLCOLBE, Calgary.
MISS ALICE LEE, Nassau.
N. P. BASAMAS.
DR. ALEX LINDSAY, Halifax.
C. B. LYON, Vancouver.
H. H. LYMAN and MRS. LYMAN, Montreal.
A. G. MAGINNIS, London.
C. C. MALLOCH, London.
C. MALLOCH, Lardo, B. C.
J. GABRIEL MARKS, MRS. MARKS, Suva, Fiji.
MISS MILLER, St. Catharines, Ont.
A. E. MULLINS, London.
MISS E. MULLINS, London.
H. R. O'HARA, MRS. O'HARA, MISS HELEN O'HARA, Toronto.
W. LEONARD PALMER and MRS. PALMER, London.
MRS. W. E. PATON, Sherbrooke.
MRS. W. H. PRICE, New Zealand.
F. J. RUTHERFORD, Montreal.
F. SEYBOLD and MRS. SEYBOLD, G. BOGUE SMART, Ottawa.
MRS. A. STORK, Toronto.
C. D. TYLEE and MRS TYLEE, Montreal.
J. T. TAYLOR, MISS D. TAYLOR and MISS H. TAYLOR, Montreal.
MISS C. TOWNSEND, New Zealand.
A. J. WAKEFIELD, Liverpool.
REV. J. WALLET, London.
F. E. ABBOTT, C. R. BURT, DAVID JOHNSON, Frederickton.
W. D. GRAHAM and MRS. GRAHAM, Hongkong, China.
MRS. D. T. HAITEY, Vancoucer.
G. W. S. HENDERSON, Montreal.
A. HIRST, Birmingham.
MRS. C. C. HOLLOWAY, Quebec.
G. F. HOWES, Birmingham.
L. A. SYAMSON, LAURENCE IRVING, SIR HENRY SETON KERR, London.
LIONEL KEAT, MISS GRACE KOHL, Montreal.
MISS JENNIE NEWTON, Antler, N. D.
F. OLSENDER, London, England.
JOHN PATTERSON, ROBT. PATTERSON, E. PATTERSON, Calgary.
J. PATTRICK, Toronto.
W. H. PERRY, Peterboro, Ont.
H. PETERSON, MRS. PETERSON, Winnipeg.
MISS A. PRIESTLY, MISS M. PRIESTLY, Edmonton.
MISS C. HOPE, Hamilton, Ont.
MRS. HOWARD and two children, Calgary.
MR. and MRS. HOWARTS and MASTER HOWARTS, Calgary.
MISS E. DeHUNT, Vancouver.
MRS. GEORGE JOHNSTONE, Santa Barbara, California.
EVAN KAVALASKY and wife, Duluth, Minnesota.
MIS. FREDA J. KRUSE, MR. HERMAN KRUSE, Rochester, Minn.
W. H. LANGSLEY, Merritt, B.C.
MISS E. LANGSLEY, Vancouver.
MR. and MRS. E. LAW and MASTER LAW, Calgary.
J. LENNON, Winnipeg.
MISS A. LISTON, London, Eng.
E. MALLER, Indianapolis.
A. McALPINE, Montreal.
MRS. CHAS. MOIR, Toronto.
J. MORGAN, WM. MORGAN, Winnipeg.
MRS. C. PRIOR, Winnipeg.
MISS W. M. QUARTLEY, Vancouver.
MRS. JOHN REILLY, Hamilton, Ont.
MR. and MRS. W. J. RICHARDSON, Vancouver.
G. O. RICHARDS, MRS. RICHARDS, Terre Haute, Wisconsin.
MRS. J. SAMPSON, Guelph, Ont.
MISS SCHENTGUTI, Montreal.
JOHN SCHOTT, Mortlach, Sask.
MISS EVA S. EARL, Seattle, Wash.
W. SHATTEROK, Nesbitt, Man.
REGINALD SIMMONDS, London, Eng.
MRS. SIMMONDS, London, Eng.
MRS. E. SMITH, Calgary.
MISS ISABELLE SMITH, Calgary.
MISS ISABELLE STAGE, Toronto.
MRS. E. STAINER, Calgary.
MR. and MRS. STANYEN, Montreal.
J. STITLMAN, Calgary.
MISS A. SWINDLEHURST, Toronto.
MISS ELIZA TAPLIA, Kamloops, B. C.
MISS. B. VETEN, Victoria, B. C.
A. VINCENT, MISS VINCENT, Faircross, Eng.
MISS ALICE VONLEY, Hamilton.
MRS. J. WHITEGLOW, Westminster, B. C.
MRS. G. WHITE and Infant, New Westminster, B. C.
MISS EWILT, Campbelliard, Ont.
MISS MARY WOOD, Regina, Sask.
MRS. S. WOOD, Toronto.
MRS. H. YATES, HARRY YATES, Hamilton, Ont.

The Lethbridge Daily Herald Alberta 1914-05-29

Comments

Mrs Richardson

Apparently this was Mary Ann Griffin, widow, also from Adelaide. Contact me for more info: agabb@tpg.com.au

Andrew

Passenger list

look at ..passenger and crew list
Empress of Ireland passenger and crew list

Empress Of Ireland

Suzie,
I've just become aware of your 27 / 8 /10 enquiry for information on the Mr and Mrs W Richardson who died in the Empress Of Ireland tragedy.
My great grand father was William John Richardson who died on the Empress, I too want information, I will share what I know with you, please get in touch.
Greg Richardson 24 Coral Tree Ave Noosa Heads Queensland Australia 4567 ph. (07) 54474023 mob. 0427854327
Kind Regards,
Greg

Mr and Mrs W Richardson

Does anyone have any information of this couple that died on the Empress of Ireland boat?
We particularly want to know the identity of Mrs Richardaon as the real mrs richardson was in melbourne with their children.....
thanks suzie