Electra, TX Tornado, Apr 1922

TWO ARE SERIOUSLY INJURED AT ELECTRA

ELECTRA, Texas, April 8. -- A cyclone struck this city at 6 a.m. Saturday destroying numerous small residences in the north part.  According to early estimates the damage will reach $150,000.

Six persons were injured, two of whom are in serious condition.

The storm came from the southwest and was accompanied by a heavy rain.  Telephone and light wires are down.

Mrs. T. M. Cruse and E. Gartner are in a hospital and at 11 o'clock were still unconscious.  Mrs. Cruse was injured when her residence, three miles northwest of the city, was demolished. Gartner's residence, near the Waggoner refinery, was torn to bits.  Mrs. T. C. Lewis was badly burned and her daughter and granddaughter received minor injuries when their residence in the north part was turned over by the wind.  The burns were caused by an oil stove.  Mrs. J. M. Cruse and three children sustained minor injuries when their house on the south side was torn to splinters.

The Magnolia Petroleum Company reports that several derricks on the Sumner and Piper leases were blown down and some damage is reported south of the city in the oil fields.  It is reported that but little damage was done in the Fowlkes field.

The 9-year-old son of Lee Wallace, living in the north part of the town received minor injuries, J. A. Bruce, barber, is reported slightly injured from flying debris.  Mrs. E. H. Burlison and baby were slightly injured.

The path of the storm was over the east and north part of the city and missed the business district altogether.  Apparently the storm was worse to the west three miles, as considerable damage was done in that section to derricks and oil field residences.

Nay Hightower sustained three broken ribs and was injured in the abdomen when a derrick in which we was working two miles south blew down and an eight-inch bit fell on him.  The derrick caught fire but Hightower was rescued by his brother before the flames reached him.

The wind reached a high velocity at Harrold, six miles west, and unroofed several barns and did minor damage to residences but no fatalities were reported.

Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Fort Worth, TX 8 Apr 1922