Fort Worth, TX flood, Sept 1900

THE TRINITY RIVER HAS FLOODED FORT WORTH

Fort Worth, Texas, Sept. 28. - The Trinity river continued to rise all day and is fully thirty-five feet at this point. The overflow reaches out more than a mile, resembling a large lake and is from three to six feet deep.

Much of the Cotton Belt railroad track has been carried away. The Cotton Belt station is surrounded with water three or four feet deep and all businesses is suspended temporarily as trains cannot get into the yards, or even within a mile of them.

The waters have interferred with the running of trains and street cars in the city. Service over the North side street car lines has been abandoned.

It has been many years since the waters of the Trinity have reached such a high stage. As yet no loss of life has been reported but it is reported that possibly some people have perished below this city in the Trinity river bottoms by the unprecidented overflow.

The people below here were not notified of the great fire as they were at this point. The damage to farms along the river will be very great and possibly the loss will reach $100,000.

Last night water around the water works station was three feet deep. If the flood continues to rise damage to the water works cannot be averted.

The family of Superintendent Evans were saved from the swollen stream by friends who went to them in a row boat.

The Colorado Springs Gazette - Telegraph, Colorado Springs, CO 29 Sept 1900
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FORT WORTH BUDGET

HEAVY DAMAGE DONE TO COUNTY ROADS AND BRIDGES BY THE RECENT HEAVY RAINS.

DAMAGE DONE TO BRIDGES.

Tarrant County Suffred [sic] Considerable Loss by the Rains.

SPECIAL TO THE NEWS.

Fort Worth, Tex., Sept. 24. - Great damage has been done by the recent heavy rains to roads, bridges and culverts in this vicinity. County Commissioner Barr, who has just returned from a trip over precinct No. 1, states that the damages in this precinct alone will reach at least $2,500. A number of bridges have been washed away, including one over Sycamore Creek, east of the city, and two over the same stream south of here, and the bridge over Deer Creek this side of Crowley. Nearly all the culverts between here and Crowley and Burleson were more or less damaged, and in many places the gravel was washed off the roads.

From late reports, it seems that like damage has been done throughout the county, and it would be a difficult matter at the present time to estimate the total amount of it all.

DAMAGE TO THE COTTON CROP.

Nell P. Anderson Estimates It at Ten Per Cent.

SPECIAL TO THE NEWS.

Fort Worth, Tex., Sept. 24. - Mr. Nell P. Anderson, the well-known handler of cotton of this city, said to The News correspondent today, relative to the damage to cotton from the recent rains:

"We have received reports from about fifty of our buyers and we estimate that the damage to cotton from the recent heavy rains will be about 10 per cent. Of course we can not make an accurate estimate for the reason that we are unable to ascertain what damage water may do. It may kill it entirely by rotting and it may not suffer to any considerable extent. Our information is to the effect that in Collin and Hunt Counties where there are very large crops this year the rain has done damage. We have not heard of any cotton sprouting.

"With the damage 10 per cent the crop will be as large and as profitable as last year. The crop in north Texas will be better, so I am informed, than the south Texas crop. Fort Worth has already paid out a considerable amount for this season's fleecy staple. I guess the amount has reached in the neighborhood of $2,000,000. Texas had in the neighborhood of 2,500,000 bales last year. I never guess at the number of bales we will get, but as I said before the prospects for a better crop in our section are very bright."

The Dallas Morning News, Dallas, TX 25 Sept 1900