Salt Lake City, UT Train - Sleigh Wreck, Feb 1903

SLEIGH NO MATCH FOR RAILROAD TRAIN
IS KNOCKED OFF THE TRACK AND ONE OF THE PARTY KILLED AND OTHERS HURT

(By Associated Press)
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, Feb. 16. - A large double sleigh containing a party of ten young people was struck by a Rio Grande Western passenger train here early today. The sled was hurled through the air for a hundred feet and demolished. One of the party, MISS PEARL QUALLES, was instantly killed and none escaped injury. Miss Qualles was sitting on the driver's seat and the pilot of the engine struck the sleigh precisely where she was sitting. Holmes, the driver, was internally injured, and is in a critical condition. The other members of the party were sitting the in rear portion of the sleigh. To keep out the cold they had covered their heads with blankets and had no intimation of approaching danger.

Fort Worth Telegram, Ft. Worth, TX 16 Feb 1903

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SLEIGH STRUCK BY TRAIN
One Young Woman Killed and Nine Are Injured.

Salt Lake, Utah, Feb 16 - A large double sleigh, containing a party of ten young people, was struck by a Rio Grande Western passenger train here early today. The sled was hurled through the air for a hundred feet and demolished. One of the party was instantly killed and none escaped injury.

The dead:
MISS PEARL QUALLES, aged 17.

The injured: H. Fulmer, cut about head and body; Miss Fulmer, his sister, badly bruised; William Bailey, internal injuries; Lizzie Stoker, cut and bruised; William Randall, cut and bruised; Miss Jean Haignes, badly bruised; Miss Addie Haignes, internal injuries; E. L. Huber, cut and bruised; A. Holmes, driver of the sleigh, probably fatally injured.

Miss Qualles was sitting on the driver's seat and the pilot of the engine struck the sleigh precisely where she was sitting. Holmes, the driver, was internally injured and is in a critical condition. The other members of the party were sitting in the rear portion of the sleigh. To keep out of the cold they had covered their heads with blankets and had no intimation of approaching danger.

Dallas Morning News, Dallas, TX 17 Feb 1903