Woodside, UT Train Wreck, May 1923 - Thirty Injured

THIRTY ARE INJURED

D. & R. G. TRAIN HITS OPEN SWITCH – CRASHES INTO DITCH.

ENGINEER, FIREMAN AND FIVE PASSENGERS AMONG THOSE KILLED.

Grand Junction, Colo. --- Seven persons were killed and thirty injured at Woodside, Utah, 185 miles west of Grand Junction, a few days ago, when the Denver & Rio Grande flyer Train No. 1 hit an open switch and two engines, two baggage cars, the smoker and a chaircar left the tracks and crashed into the ditch.
The dead are:
Engineer FRED R. RADER, 60, living at 117 Grande avenue, Grand Junction.
ALBERT ANDERSON, 30 years old, of Grand Junction.
MRS. MORRIS, of Moab, Utah.
Four other unidentified passengers.
Engineer RADER was killed instantly when his engine, the second of the double-header, left the rails and crashed over on its side.
MRS. MORRIS was killed when the chair car and smoker telescoped the baggage car and the smoker piled up on top of the baggage coach.
Relief trains containing doctors, nurses and wrecking apparatus were rushed from Grand Junction and from Helper, Green River and other nearby railroad centers.
The train, which was a through fast train from San Francisco to Denver, consisted of seven or eight sleepers in addition to the four coaches which left the track with the two engines.
WILLIAM GILLIS, fireman of the second engine, was not injured and the engineer of the first engine, JOE WESTBROOK, also escaped injury, although both engines turned over.
Officials of the D. & R. G. W. made every effort to send help to the scene of the disaster and more complete reports of the dead and injured are expected soon.
Engineer RADER is one of the oldest and best known engineers on the system.
Woodside is a siding in the desert lands of eastern Utah.

Eagle County News Colorado 1923-05-12