Jackson, UT Train Wreck & Explosion Destroys Town, Feb 1904 - Twenty-Five Killed

TWENTY-FIVE PERISH IN DYNAMITE EXPLOSION

CARLOAD OF THAT EXCEEDINGLY ACTIVE MATERIAL IS SET OFF BY COLLISION BETWEEN TRAINS.

STATION IN UTAH IS THEATER

Of the Forty-Six Persons Who Were at the Place Named at the Time of the Disaster Only Nine Escaped---Conductor Killed Was Formerly Resident of Beaver Dam. In This State---Great Destruction Caused by the Accident---Shock Is Felt Miles Away.

(By Associated Press.)

Ogden, Utah, Feb. 20.---Twenty-five persons have been killed, fifteen others injured, several, it is believed, fatally, and a great amount of railroad property destroyed by an explosion of a carload of dynamite at Jackson, a telegraph station on the western end of the Great Ogden-Lucin cut off, on the Southern Pacific railway.

The explosion was caused by a collision between two freight trains, due, it is said, to the failure of the air brakes apparatus to operate.

Eight of the dead and five of the injured are Americans, the others are Greek laborers.

THE DEAD.

The dead: T. W. Burke, section foreman, his wife and three children;
J. W. Burke, a former general foreman;
W. L. Holler, messenger;
Owen Dermody, conductor, formerly of Beaver Dam, Wis.;
seventeen Greek laborers.

THE EXPLOSION.

The explosion following the collision between the two trains which met head on almost in front of the telegraph station, was terrific.
Everything within a radius of half a mile was wrecked. The town of Terrace, fifteen miles to the north, was shaken as though by an earthquake.

Window panes in the station at Colon fifteen miles away were shattered and the sound of the explosion was heard in this city, eighteen miles from the scene of the disaster.

The ground upon which the trains were standing was torn up for over a thousand feet, leaving a great excavation thirty feet in depth.

Fragments of a dozen freight cars and two engines were thrown for incredible distances over the surrounding country, the station building was blown to splinters and the dead and injured were scattered for hundreds of feet in all directions, most of them having their clothing torn off.

FIRST NEWS.

Telegraph wires and poles were torn down for a thousand feet and the first knowledge of the disaster came from Terrace, fifteen miles away, the operator at that point reporting to headquarter that he saw an immense cloud of white smoke ascend from Jackson and spread out at a great height.

A relief train with doctors, nurses and stretchers was hurriedly dispatched from this city. The train returned with the injured who were placed in the company's general hospital.

The great loss of life among the Greeks is accounted for by the fact that they occupied outfitting cars, which were standing near the spot where the explosion occurred.

FEW ESCAPE.

Of the forty-six persons at Jackson at the time of the explosion, only nine escaped death or injury.

The great railroad trestle over the lake was not damaged, the explosion occurring a short distance beyond the western end of that structure.

The Daily Northwestern, Oshkosh, WI 20 Feb1904