Burlington, VT Train Wreck, Jan 1903

FATAL CRASH ON THE RUTLAND.

Wild Engine Strikes Train Opposite Dr. Webb's Vermont Estate---Two Killed Outright.

BURLINGTON, Vt., Jan. 2.---The New York flier, north-bound, collided to-night with a wild engine on the Rutland Railroad opposite Dr. W. Seward Webb's estate in Shelburne. The engineers of both engines were killed and their firemen probably fatally hurt. No passengers were seriously injured.

The New York Times, New York, NY 3 Jan 1903

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DR. W. SEWARD WEBB TESTIFIES

Denies That Accident on Jan. 2 Was Due to His Orders.

Special to The New York Times.

BURLINGTON, Vt., Dec. 21.---Dr. W. Seward Webb, President of the Rutland Railroad, was a witness before the State Railroad Commission, which met in this city to-day to investigate the cause of the railroad accident on the Rutland Road between this city and Shelburne Jan. 2 last, when a wild engine collided with a regular passenger train, and five men were killed.

It was rumored at the time that Dr. Webb had ordered the engine to Shelburne for his private train. Dr. Webb denied this emphatically, saying his private train was in New York at the time. He further said that he did not plan to leave Shelburne on the night of the accident, and if he had, he would not have called a freight engine into service.

The New York Times, New York, NY 22 Dec 1903

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THE RUTLAND ROAD WRECK.

President Was Not Using Engine That Caused Five Deaths.

Special to The New York Times.

BURLINGTON, Vt., Jan. 26.---The State Board of Railroad Commissions has filed a report on the accident in which five men were killed on the Rutland Railroad between this city and Shelburne Jan. 2 of last year. Interest in the cast centered in persistent rumors that the collision was caused by Dr. Webb, the president of the road, ordering an engine to Shelburne for his personal use on the time of the northbound express train.

The commission finds that no orders had been given by Dr. Webb or any one in his employ concerning the movements of the engine, and that it was en route to Shelburne to get a caboose for a work train.

The New York Times, New York, NY 27 Jan 1904