Old Shadwell, VA Train Wreck, Nov 1897

TRAIN WRECKED.

FOUR KILLED, MANY HURT.

H. CLAY EVANS AND SENATOR ORVILLE H. PLATT ON THE ILL-FATED TRAIN, BUT NOT INJURED.

Charlottesville, Va., Nov. 4. -- The Chesapeake and Ohio vestibule express, known as the F.F.V.
from Cincinnati to Washington, was wrecked near Old Shadwell, five miles east of this place at 1:25 this afternoon. Four persons were killed and seventeen injured.
The cause of the wreck has not been definitely ascertained, but it is believed to have been due to spreading rails. The engine left the track at a sharp curve and was hurled against a rocky hill.
All of the cars except the dining car and the Richmond sleeper were derailed. Two cars plunged end foremost down the steep embankment and one of them went into the Rivanna River, which, at this place, skirts the tracks. The day passenger coach and the express car were badly wrecked.
As the locomotive plunged from the rails and overturned, Engineer DUKE was hurled from the cab and crushed under the engine, besides being terribly scalded by escaping steam. He was rescued by his fireman and the conductor.
As soon after the crash as possible the uninjured passengers and trainmen began the work of rescue and aiding the injured. Word was sent to this place and a wrecking train with physicians was immediately dispatched to the scene of the wreck. The body of HENRY BURNETT, the colored porter, was the last recovered. He was terribly mangled, having been in the baggage car. A foot, supposed to be his, was first recovered and later a portion of the head. The body was literally dismembered. MARENO had both legs cut off and died at the hospital at Charlottesville.
The dead:
HENRY BURNETT, colored, porter, Keswick, Va.
An Italian woman named MERARA and infant believed to be from Cincinnati.
PHELIX MARENO (died after removal to Charlottesville.)
It is reported that the body of another Italian child is under the wreck, but this cannot be confirmed.
Among the uninjured passengers on the train were Senator Orville H. Platt of Connecticut; Commissioner of Pensions H. Clay Evans and Representative Walter Evans, of Louisville.
The local railway officials after investigating the cause of the accident declared that it was not due to spreading rails, though they are unable to give even a theory. They state that the tracks at the spot are true and examination revealed that they are tied securely.

Daily Gazette Xenia Ohio 1897-11-05