Mt. Baldy, WA Private Plane Crashes, Aug 1952

E. W. Cleveland.jpg

THREE DIE IN PLANE MISHAP IN CASCADES.

VICTIMS OF MOUNTAIN CRASH IDENTIFIED ALMOST POSITIVELY AS E. W. CLEVELAND, ONE OF NATION'S PIONEER AVIATORS, AND HIS WIFE AND SECRETARY -- ACCIDENT OCCURS WHEN FOG TRAPS CRAFT.

Seattle (AP) -- A plane crash in a rugged Cascade mountain area late Thursday killed two women and a pilot who was identified almost positively as one of the nation's pioneer aviators.
The victims were believed to be E. W. CLEVELAND, 62, of Cleveland, Ohio; his wife, LUCILLE, and his secretary, MRS. ANNABELLE ELMSLIE, 43.
The light plane crashed when fog trapped it on a flight from Spokane to Renton, outside Seattle. It crashed and burned near Mount Baldy, about 30 miles southeast of Seattle, in a wilderness area close to twice that distance by highway and back roads.
A sheriff's party radioed from the isolated scene late Thursday night that the pilot and one woman were burned almost beyond recognition. The other woman was thrown clear.
The dead pilot had a cigarette lighter with the initials "E.W.C." on it. The burned plane was a Beechcraft, the type CLEVELAND was flying.
Coroner John Brill, Jr., hiked to the crash site Friday to try to establish definite identification and bring out the bodies.
Charles S. Chester, state director of aeronautics, attributed the tragedy to "flying in adverse weather." Another small plane crashed in the same area but the pilot walked away safely.
CLEVELAND was a vice president of the Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Co., vice president and a director of the Electronic Research Corp., and founder and part owner of the Aero Engineering Co.
CLEVELAND made his first flight at the age of 21 at Hammondsport, N.Y.
The flight, in a single-seater pusher type plane, was unauthorized and as CLEVELAND recalled, "I was fired when I landed."
In Cleveland Mrs. Annamay Endie said she was reasonably sure of the identifications. Mrs. Endie, twin sister of MRS. ELMSLIE said "if they were alive they would have communicated with us long before now."
The three were on a vacation.
It was just a year ago next Monday that 500 persons, headed by James H. Doolittle, leader of the 1942 raid over Tokyo, paid tribute to CLEVELAND'S air pioneering at a dinner in his home city.

Daily Chronicle Centralia Washington 1952-08-08