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Oconto WI Tornado Nov 1917

A Tornado
Passes over Oconto County.
5 MILES SOUTH OF OCONTO
PENSAUKEE IN RUINS!
Terrible Destruction to Farm Property!
6 Killed and 32 Wounded!
Swift Destruction
'Twas not a trackless wind, but one which left behind it a broad and well marked track of desolation, of ruin, of death, of misery, such a track of fearful and impartial ruin as---with one single exception, that of Oct., 1871---was never before made by the elements within the borders of the State of Wisconsin. At between four and five o'clock the afternoon of Saturday the 7th inst. the sky became overcast with black and threatening clouds, flash after flash of blinding lightening chased each other through the murky air, peal after peal of deafening thunder shook the firmest buildings to their very foundations, and reverberated with terrifying distinctness, with two short intervals, the rain decended in torrents for about one hour, when it ceased and immediately the clouds took on a peculiar and indescribable appearance which all who beheld it instinctively knew portended danger and destruction. The clouds in the northern heavens were moving westward with fearful velocity, and in the southern heavens they were moving castward with equal speed. At a point ten miles west of Oconto, and near the big hill just east of Stiles the two sweft currents of air met, and after a few moments opposing their fearful forces they united in swift round dance of desolation and death. The result of the union of those opposing currents was visible from many miles, taking the form of an inverted funnel with the appearance of leaden colored mist, which apparently remained stationary for a minute or two, as if deliberating in its choice of victims. Its track was quickly chosen moving southeast it crossed the Oconto river near the residence of Mr. Peter Plain it dismantled the barns on the farm of Thos. Duffy. Now fully off on its career of vandalism it seemed to fairly laugh at such obstructions as human hands had built in its way. The largest trees in its course were broken like pipe stems, or uprooted and hurled to incredible distances, striking the wing to the residence of Rev. O. B. Clark it demonstrated to the Rev. gentleman how frail "are all things here below" next in its track it hurled from its foundations the new residence of Mr. Milton Weaver; further on the barn of Peter Rosencrantz, the barn and blacksmith shop and cattle sheds of John Hartung and one barn of John Traverse were demolished. Yet a little further and it struck the residence and barn of Charles Ritter, seriously perhaps fatally injuring Mr. Ritter, and utterly destroying his buildings, next came the residence of Squire J. A. Glynn, which was struck on the south-west corner, demolishing the kitchen, and badly bruising Mr. Glynn's sons, a half grown lad was lifted to the height of twenty-five feet in the air, and carried a distance of forty-five rods and deposited in a rye field, he was found badly frightened, but unhurt and entirely destitute of clothing.
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