Ricohoc, LA Railroad Collision In Fog, Mar 1925

THIRTEEN DEAD IN RAILROAD WRECK.

FAST MAIL TRAINS ON SOUTHERN PACIFIC COLLIDE DURING A FOG AT TOWN OF RICOHOC, IN LOUISIANA.

New Orleans, La., March 22. -- Thirteen persons lost their lives in a wreck early today when two fast mail trains of the Southern Pacific railroad collided during a fog at Richohoc, La, between Franklin and Patterson. Four of the dead were white men, the others negro passengers. Five were seriously injured.
According to an official report, number 12, eastbound, ran by a signal in a fog and crashed into number 109, westbound at about 3 a.m. The dead included FRANK STAFFORD, news butcher; E. D. CONERY, engineer and FRANK NEBILY, fireman on number 109; AUGUST AUPAST, baggage master of No. 12, and nine negro passengers.
Others riding on the train were shaken up.
The bodies of the dead were taken to Franklin, where an inquest was conducted late today. The injured were taken to Patterson.

Nebraska State Journal Lincoln 1925-03-23

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TWO FAST TRAINS CRASH IN FOG.

BAGGAGE CAR AND COACH TELESCOPED.

PORT ARTHUR NEWSBOY, OUT ON HIS FIRST TRIP, IS AMONG DEAD.

New Orleans, La., March 22. -- (AP) -- Thirteen persons lost their lives in a wreck early today when two fast mail trains of the Southern Pacific Railroad collided during a fog at Ricohoc, La., between Franklin and Patterson. Four of the dead were white men, the other negro passengers. Five were seriously injured.
According to an official report, No. 12, eastbound, ran by a signal in a fog and crashed into No. 109, westbound, at about 3 a.m.
The dead:
FRANK STAFFORD, of Port Arthur, Tex., news agent.
E. D. CONNERY, of New Orleans, veteran engineer on No. 109.
FRANK NEBILY, fireman on No. 109.
AUGUST AUPAST, baggagemaster of No. 12.
Nine negro passengers have not been identified.
The seriously injured:
A. J. THIBODEAUX, fireman on No. 12.
FRANK MATHEWS, engineer on No. 12.
Three unidentified negro passengers.
Others riding on the train were shaken up.
The bodies of the dead were taken to Franklin, where an inquest was completed late today. The injured were taken to Patterson.
The official report said Engineer MATHEWS of the eastbound San Antonio Express came through the fog and passed the switch signal at Ricohoc, where he was scheduled to have put in for the westbound mail. About 900 feet past the switch the two trains came together.
The baggage car and the front passenger coach of No. 12 telescoped. The negroes occupied the coach. The tender and baggage coach of No. 109 also telescoped.
Engineer MATHEWS telephoned railroad officials that he was badly hurt and too nervous to talk. He was said to have stated he became lost in the fog and did not know he had passed the switch.
CONNERY with 42 years on the Southern Pacific and second oldest engineer in point of service, had made preparations to retire soon.
STAFFORD, the newsboy, was making his first trip having started out from Houston, Texas.
It was testified at the coroner's inquest that No. 12 had orders to wait at Ricohoc switch for No. 109, but that Engineer MATHEWS made no attempt to stop at the east end of the switch, and, although his conductor, CRANE, signaled him three times to stop and finally put on air, the train was struck by No. 109 before she came to a stop, having run over the switch. When questioned the engineer said he had missed the block because of the fog.
The track was strewn with wreckage and torn for some distance. Tonight trains were still being detoured by way of Lafayette.

Galveston Daily News Texas 1925-03-23