Clinton, MN Tornado, Jun 1908

SEVEN PERSONS KILLED BY TORNADO AT CLINTON, MINN.

List of Injured May Total Fifty---Passenger Coach Blown From the Track, the 17 Occupants Being Hurt----Twenty Houses, a Printing Office and Two Churches Demolished.

(News Tribune Special.)

FARGO, N. D., June 27.----A tornado struck Clinton, Minn., at 5:35 o'clock this afternoon, killed seven people and injured 25, some seriously. Twenty houses, the Advocate printing office and two churches were blown down. The telephone exchange is also wrecked.

The dead:

MORTON HIGGINS,
THOMAS ROCKWELL,
MISS KATE MILLS,
FRED STATESBERRY,
MRS. REBECCA VANDERMARK,
MRS. OLAS NICHOLSON and 2 year old daughter.

Missing:

Mrs. T. M. Johnson

A partial list of the injured follows, all these being serioulsy hurt:

Miss Lottie Rockwell,
Bert Rockwell,
Rachael Higgins,
James Morrow,
Mrs. George Phalen,
child of Mrs. George Phalen.

Injured, not seriously:

C. G. Johnson,
Mrs. John Hagaman,
Mrs. Theodore Condit,
Frank Oestrich,
Mrs. Swenson,
Mrs. F. D. Cowles, Minneapolis.
Rev. Father Keavey, Graceville.

The tornado, which was accompanied by rain, started three miles north of the town, destroyed two farm houses that were in its path and swept over Clinton, which has about 400 people.

Cars Blown From Track.

A Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul mixed train was just pulling into the station as the storm struck the town. Fifteen freight cars were blown off the track, as was also a passenger coach containing 17 people. All were injured, none seriously.

The two churches which were destroyed are the Norwegian Lutheran and the Methodist Episcopal.

Telegraph lines were blown down, but as soon as possible news of the disaster was sent to a neighboring city. Soon help was on the way from Ortonville, Graceville, Montevideo and Wheaton and all nearby Minnesota towns on the Milwaukee road, and from Milbank, S. D., which is but a few miles away. Relief trains were run from Graceville, Ortonville, and Montevideo. The houses that were not demolished have been thrown open to the injured and homeless.

The storm followed a day of intense heat and came so suddenly that no warning of its approach was given the people.

The Duluth News Tribune, Duluth, MN 26 Jun 1908

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