Ravenna, OH Terrible Train Collision, July 1891

The flagman is selected generally from among the best brakemen and is paid extra for his work. He is provided with a lantern and track torpedoes, and is expected to guard the train from others approaching from other directions. The flagman is instructed to not only wave his lantern but place torpedoes on the track. In this way the approaching train is given warning to stop. Freight train No. 82 left Kent five minutes behind the passenger, and the latter had stopped at the station eight minutes when the crash came. In that time the flagman could have gone back a mile, if necessary, but he did not do so. Engineer PENDERGAST and Conductor BOYNTON, two of the oldest and most trusted employes on the road, were in charge of the passenger train. I do not know who the freight crew were nor whether any of them were hurt. It is slow work obtaining reliable information."
An Eye Witness.
Captain WALLACE, one of Warren's best known citizens, was in the third coach from the rear of the train asleep in his berth when the shock came. His story of the awful affair is as follows:
"The train was composed of vestibuled sleepers. It was, as near as I can tell, about 3 a.m., when a crash unlike anything I ever before experienced, came. I was thrown from my berth and nearly knocked senseless, but finally crawled from under a pile of debris and found myself comparatively uninjured. I looked about me and the sight that met my gaze I will never forget. The three rear coaches, including the one I was in, were piled up in an indescribable mass and flames shot up from two of them like from a huge bon fire. The air was filled with the moans and shrieks of the imprisoned passengers and strong men stood helpless with the knowledge that before their eyes human beings were being burned or crushed to death. My first thought was for the people in the rear coach. When I boarded the train my attention was called to them by some one remarking that there was a party of fifty-three men in the rear car. When the freight crashed into us it crushed this car into a thousand pieces and flames broke out almost immediately. How any of the passengers in that car escaped, if they did, is a mystery. I saw them take some eighteen or twenty bodies from the wreck, but I do not think that that is half of those who will be found to be missing when the reports are in. I am of the opinion that every man in the rear coach was killed. The sight of the corpses as they were taken from under the debris was sickening. Pieces of flesh, an arm or a leg were found and in this way it was impossible to tell how many were killed. Every piece that was taken out was burned to a crisp, so that identification was impossible. When I left the scene the wreck was still smouldering and the air was fairly thick with the odor of burning bodies."
The Dead.
The following is the list of the dead so far as identified:
THOMAS VINHILL, Corning, N. Y.
DAVID RELITAN, Corning, N. Y.
WILLIAM KANE, Brooklyn, N. Y.
ALBERT GANTRAP, Corning, N. Y.
HENRY GILDAY, Corning, N. Y.
The Wounded.
The following is a list of those wounded and missing:
FRED HUFF, Corning, N. Y.
FRED BURNS, Corning, N. Y.
JAMES GRIFFIN, Boston.
A. HARDEMAN, Corning, N. Y.
LEWIS KIMBALL, Corning, N. Y.
WM. NEWCOMB, Corning, N. Y.
JOHN CADIGAN.
JOSEPH MADIGAN.
THOMAS HANLEY.
JAMES DWYICKIN.
GEORGE SMITH.
DENNIS RYAN.

The Fort Wayne Sentinel Indiana 1891-07-03

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The following is an accurate and complete list of the dead in the wreck:
JOHN COYLE.
DAVID RELATIN.
FRANK BURNS.
JOHN GRIFFIN.
FRED DUFF.
OWEN HARDMAN.
DENNIS RYAN.
PATRICK RYAN.
DENNIS CASSIDY.
ALBERT GUNTHERUP.
JOHN DENNE.
HENRY GILDE.
T. A. NOTAN.
THOMAS KIEVELLE.
WILLIAM NEWCOMBE.
All of the above named are from Corning, N. Y.
WILLIAM KANE, aged 14, of Brooklyn.
JOHN KIMBALL, of Findlay.
MRS. MAMIE KENNAN and Child, of Chicago.

The Weekly News Mansfield Ohio 1891-07-09

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Add'l info

The killed glassworkers, who were returning home to Corning, N.Y., from a union meeting in Findlay, Ohio, were buried in a mass grave in a cemetery in South Corning, N.Y., under a large monument that features a bronze statute of glassblower.

The monument reads: “This monument has been erected by the American Flint Glass Workers Union to the memory of eighteen of its members who were killed in a railroad disaster which occurred at Ravenna, Ohio, July 3, 1891, while they were en route from Findlay, Ohio, to their homes in Corning, New York, wither they were journeying to meet loving friends from whom they had been separated by an effort to improve their industrial conditions. Erected 1892.”