Milford, PA (near) Plane Crashes, Aug 1928

DEAD FLIERS BROUGHT OUT BY AVIATORS.

MERRILL AND RONNE FOUND AT DAYBREAK YESTERDAY.

BODIES SENT TO HOMES.

LYING IN DENSE UNDERBRUSH BOTH BATTERED BEYOND RECOGNITION.

Milford, Pa., Aug. 30 (AP) -- Fellow aviators and searchers carried out of the wilderness late today the bodies of MAZEL M. MERRILL and EDWIN RONNE, killed in a crash of Colonel Charles A. Lindbergh's Curtiss Falcon plane six miles from here.
The two, lost on a flight from Buffalo to Curtiss Field, N.Y., were found dead at daybreak after more than 150 men had searched most of the night through the dense growth of scrub oak and pine. Their wrecked plane had been sighted from the air the day before.
The plane fell in the heart of a country rarely visited even by hunters.
The nearest road, a half-mile away, is an abandoned trail, overgrown with underbrush. Over this a wagon, drawn by a team of horses, forced its way.
Men packed the bodies through the dense undergrowth this half mile. Their process was slow. "Cappy" Jones, president of the Curtiss Flying Service and MERRILL'S chief, directed the removal of the bodies.
The coroner's jury, summoned earlier in the day, waited to begin an inquest when the wagon reached town. Immediately after the inquest, an undertaker prepared the bodies for shipment tonight to Buffalo and Garden City, the respective homes of the birdmen.
RONNE was manager of the municipal flying field at Buffalo. MERRILL was manager of Curtiss Field. They were returning Lindbergh's plane to the latter field when they crashed.
The plane, before diving into the ground, had sheared the top from a tall pine tree. Four hundred yards away were the motor and part of the fusilage, buried in a hole, five feet deep and twenty feet wide. A hundred yards further on was the tail and rear of the fusilage. In this was found one of the bodies battered beyond recognition.
Fifteen feet ahead and clear of the wreckage was the other man. He also was bruised and battered beyond recognition. His clothes had been torn off. Even his shoes were gone.
Rescuers said there had been no fire. The plane wreckage was scattered over a 300 yard area.
Today's find ended the greatest airplane search in this section of the country. More than two score planes participated, searching parts of four states.
At her Garden City home, MRS. MERRILL said simply, "I am trying to take it the way "MERRY" would have me."
Tomorrow the Curtiss flying service will be inoperative in tribute of MERRILL and RONNE. Both were Army trained men and served as instructors during the war. MERRILL was born in Richmond, Utah, and RONNE in Minneapolis.

The Plattsburgh Sentinel New York 1928-08-31