Plymouth, PA Coal Mine Gas Explosion, Feb 1916

NINE KILLED IN MINE EXPLOSION.

GAS BLAST WRECKS SHAFT AT PLYMOUTH, PA.

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Feb. 9. -- Nine men were killed by a gas explosion in the Ross vein of the No. 3 slope of the Nottingham mine, at Plymouth.

The death list may be larger and it is believed six persons were injured.

Company officials say the identity of the dead, as known, are:
STANLEY SHUSTA, 28, married, six small children.
JOHN LASASKI, 26, married, no children.
MICHAEL MIKALONIS, 49, married, nine children.
STANLEY STANLEWSKI, married less than one week.
VITOLD NIEWODONSKI, 19, single.
WALTER BOLESIA, 26, single.
GEORGE GORKEL, 22, married, no children.
JOHN SUBANSKIE, 30.
PETER JAMKESKI, 26.

Working in secret and against great odds, a corps of mine officials and first aid men are seeking the dead and injured. The force of the explosion has been such, however, that rescue work is slow and tedious, the mine being badly damaged.

A body of mine gas was touched off in some unknown manner, but probably by the naked lamp of one of the miners. The blast, which followed hurled men in all directions, wrecked the interior of the mine and rocked the surface. Those who escaped the blast rushed to the foot of the shaft, only to find that wreckage had made it impossible to hoist or lower the carriages. A force of men were at work quickly and in about two hours the shrieking miners at the foot were lifted to the surface.

The first aid teams of the mine made some effort at rescue work and reports were soon sent to the surface. Five of the dead were found scattered along the gangway. Further on two more bodies were found and it was reported that rescuers had came across the bodies of two more, besides a few of the injured.

The black damp followed soon in the wake of the explosion and it is believed that some of the injured have become its victims.

Tyrone Daily Herald Pennsylvania 1916-02-09

Read another article about the explosion (below)