Ingleside, WV Train Collision, May 1927

Ingleside WV Train collision 5-24-1927.jpg

2 DEAD, 20 HURT IN TRAIN WRECK NEAR BLUEFIELD.

ENGINEER AND FIREMAN SCALDED TO DEATH WHEN TWO VIRGINIAN TRAINS CRASH AT INGLESIDE.

TWENTY PERSONS ON PASSENGER HURT.

INJURIES TO PASSENGERS ON NO. 3, CHARLESTON BOUND, RESULT OF SUDDEN STOP; NO CARS DERAILED.

Bluefield, May 24. -- Two were killed and 20 injured at noon today when two Virginian Railway trains met head-on at Ingleside, W. Va., twenty miles east of Bluefield.
E. G. ALDRICH of Roanoke, Va., and his fireman, F. M. O'NEAL, of Pax, W. Va., members of the engine crew of passenger train No. 3 were scalded to death as their engine climbed to the top of the electric locomotive that drew the freight train.
Fourteen passengers on train No. 3 en route from Roanoke to Huntington were injured. Officials of the road declared early tonight that none of the passengers were seriously hurt.
Doctors and nurses from two Princeton Hospitals left immediately for the scene of the wreck.
The collision occurred near the opening of a tunnel just west of Ingleside. The passenger train after leaving the station at Ingleside had not fully gathered momentum for the run to Princeton when the engineer came face to face with the long coal train drawn by a single electric motor.
It could not be stated h ow soon before the crash the two engineers realized the impending disaster. Neither train was moving at gull speed, however, it was the opinion expressed by road officials of Princeton early tonight. Not a single car was so much as derailed. The steam locomotive drawing the five cars of the passenger train toward Charleston, like some monster alive, climbed to the top of the electric motor. It hung there, the pilot reared towards the sky, the tender, crushed and wrecked, hung under the weight of the engine from which huge volumes of steam escaped for an hour after the crash.
Virginian railroad officials at Princeton early tonight expressed the opinion that the engine crew of the ill-fated passenger train were scalded to death. The peculiar action of their locomotive in climbing almost to the top of the electric motor, led the officials to that opinion. They declared that the position of the locomotive could not account for their death in any other way.
Early tonight there had been no official report of the extent of injuries suffered by the passengers. A corps of Princeton nurses and physicians was dispatched to the scene of the wreck as quickly as relief material could be manned.
The injuries to passengers, it was stated by road officials, were caused by the sudden stop of the train. It appeared a miracle, the officials said, that none of the cars were derailed.

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